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I am trying to implement a coin problem, Problem specification is like this

Create a function to count all possible combination of coins which can be used for given amount.

All possible combinations for given amount=15, coin types=1 6 7 
1) 1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,
2) 1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,6,
3) 1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,7,
4) 1,1,1,6,6,
5) 1,1,6,7,
6) 1,7,7,

function prototype:

int findCombinationsCount(int amount, int coins[])

assume that coin array is sorted. for above example this function should return 6.

Anyone guide me how to implement this??

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here is a good solution with example: http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/dynamic-programming-set-7-coin-change/ –  HeartBeat Sep 1 '13 at 15:39

12 Answers 12

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can use generating function methods to give fast algorithms, which use complex numbers.

Given the coin values c1, c2, .., ck, to get the number of ways to sum n, what you need is the coefficient of x^n in

(1 + x^c1 + x^(2c1) + x^(3c1) + ...)(1+x^c2 + x^(2c2) + x^(3c2) + ...)....(1+x^ck + x^(2ck) + x^(3ck) + ...)

Which is the same as finding the coefficient of x^n in

1/(1-x^c1) * 1/(1-x^c2) * ... * (1-x^ck)

Now using complex numbers, x^a - 1 = (x-w1)(x-w2)...(x-wa) where w1, w2 etc are the complex roots of unity.

So

1/(1-x^c1) * 1/(1-x^c2) * ... * (1-x^ck)

can be written as

1/(x-a1)(x-a2)....(x-am)

which can be rewritten using partial fractions are

A1/(x-a1) + A2/(x-a2) + ... + Am/(x-am)

The coefficient of x^n in this can be easily found:

A1/(a1)^(n+1) + A2/(a2)^(n+1) + ...+ Am/(am)^(n+1).

A computer program should easily be able to find Ai and ai (which could be complex numbers). Of course, this might involve floating point computations.

For large n, this will be probably faster than enumerating all the possible combinations.

Hope that helps.

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6  
Interesting name coincidence? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aryabhatta –  Eran Medan Sep 27 '12 at 4:07
    
See my answer for a more practical take on this approach, with suggestions for the unspecified algorithms. –  David Eisenstat Sep 11 at 16:23

Use recursion.

int findCombinationsCount(int amount, int coins[]) {
    return findCombinationsCount(amount, coins, 0);
}

int findCombinationsCount(int amount, int coins[], int checkFromIndex) {
    if (amount == 0)
        return 1;
    else if (amount < 0 || coins.length == checkFromIndex)
        return 0;
    else {
        int withFirstCoin = findCombinationsCount(amount-coins[checkFromIndex], coins, checkFromIndex);
        int withoutFirstCoin = findCombinationsCount(amount, coins, checkFromIndex+1);
        return withFirstCoin + withoutFirstCoin;
    }
}

You should check this implementation though. I don't have a Java IDE here, and I'm a little rusty, so it may have some errors.

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6  
Shouldn't it be amount-coins[checkFromIndex]? –  Nickkk Mar 1 '13 at 14:04
    
Indeed it should –  LordAro Feb 23 at 13:49

Very simple with recursion:

 def countChange(money: Int, coins: List[Int]): Int = {
    def reduce(money: Int, coins: List[Int], accCounter: Int): Int = {
        if(money == 0) accCounter + 1
        else if(money < 0 || coins.isEmpty) accCounter
        else reduce(money - coins.head, coins, accCounter) + reduce(money, coins.tail, accCounter)
   }

   if(money <= 0 || coins.isEmpty) 0
   else reduce(money, coins, 0)
}

This is example in SCALA

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1  
questioner needs answer written in Java –  user1901867 Sep 24 '13 at 17:00
12  
coursera.org/about/honorcode –  ruslan Sep 27 '13 at 3:49

Although recursion can work and is often an assignment to implement in some college level courses on Algorithms & Data Structures, I believe the "dynamic programming" implementation is more efficient.

public static int findCombinationsCount(int sum, int vals[]) {
        if (sum < 0) {
            return 0;
        }
        if (vals == null || vals.length == 0) {
            return 0;
        }

        int dp[] = new int[sum + 1];
        dp[0] = 1;
        for (int i = 0; i < vals.length; ++i) {
            for (int j = vals[i]; j <= sum; ++j) {
                dp[j] += dp[j - vals[i]];
            }
        }
        return dp[sum];
    }
share|improve this answer
    
DP is good, but your solution cannot get the right answer. –  Mike Mar 24 '13 at 0:56
    
Can anyone figure out why this solution gives wrong answer? –  0gravity Mar 31 '13 at 23:31
    
I think the method works the way it is supposed to. It tells you the distinct number of possibilities on how to make sum with coins vals[]. For example: 51 from [1,25] <-- 3 possible ways 1x51, 1x26+1x25, 2x25+1x1 10 from [2,3,5,6] <-- 5 ways: {2,2,2,2,2}, {2,2,3,3}, {2,2,6}, {2,3,5} and {5,5}. –  Domenic D. Apr 1 '13 at 4:05
    
This is a very elegant solution. Can you add little bit description what is the intuition here? I understand that you broke the problem into several subproblems : one per every denomination while sum remains constant (I was thinking of using sum to breakup the problem ex: find combinations for 1 then 2 then 3 and so on while reusing previous sums) –  sandeepkunkunuru May 10 '13 at 21:39
package algorithms;

import java.util.Random;

/**`enter code here`
 * Owner : Ghodrat Naderi
 * E-Mail: Naderi.ghodrat@gmail.com
 * Date  : 10/12/12
 * Time  : 4:50 PM
 * IDE   : IntelliJ IDEA 11
 */
public class CoinProblem
 {
  public static void main(String[] args)
   {
    int[] coins = {1, 3, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500};

    int amount = new Random().nextInt(10000);
    int coinsCount = 0;
    System.out.println("amount = " + amount);
    int[] numberOfCoins = findNumberOfCoins(coins, amount);
    for (int i = 0; i < numberOfCoins.length; i++)
     {
      if (numberOfCoins[i] > 0)
       {
        System.out.println("coins= " + coins[i] + " Count=" + numberOfCoins[i] + "\n");
        coinsCount += numberOfCoins[i];
       }

     }
    System.out.println("numberOfCoins = " + coinsCount);
   }

  private static int[] findNumberOfCoins(int[] coins, int amount)
   {
    int c = coins.length;
    int[] numberOfCoins = new int[coins.length];
    while (amount > 0)
     {
      c--;
      if (amount >= coins[c])
       {
        int quotient = amount / coins[c];
        amount = amount - coins[c] * quotient;
        numberOfCoins[c] = quotient;
       }

     }
    return numberOfCoins;
   }
 }
share|improve this answer

The recursive solutions mentioned will work, but they're going to be horrendously slow if you add more coin denominations and/or increase the target value significantly.

What you need to speed it up is to implement a dynamic programming solution. Have a look at the knapsack problem. You can adapt the DP solution mentioned there to solve your problem by keeping a count of the number of ways a total can be reached rather than the minimum number of coins required.

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Go on then. How? –  JeremyP Nov 22 '10 at 12:11
    
Exactly as I said. In the knapsack solution, each state keeps the minimum number of coins used to get there. For this problem, you do something like dp[current_total] += dp[current_total - current_denomination]. –  marcog Nov 22 '10 at 19:59

A recursive solution might be the right answer here:

int findCombinationsCount(int amount, int coins[])
{
    // I am assuming amount >= 0, coins.length > 0 and all elements of coins > 0.
    if (coins.length == 1)
    {
        return amount % coins[0] == 0 ? 1 : 0;
    }
    else
    {
        int total = 0;
        int[] subCoins = arrayOfCoinsExceptTheFirstOne(coins);
        for (int i = 0 ; i * coins[0] <= amount ; ++i)
        {
            total += findCombinationsCount(amount - i * coins[0], subCoins);
        }
        return total;
    }
}

Warning: I haven't tested or even compiled the above.

share|improve this answer
    
Why the down vote? –  JeremyP Nov 22 '10 at 12:01

First idea:

int combinations = 0;
for (int i = 0; i * 7 <=15; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j * 6 + i * 7 <= 15; j++) {
      combinations++;
    }
}

(the '<=' is superfluous in this case, but is needed for a more general solution, if you decide to change your parameters)

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Again using recursion a tested solution, though probably not the most elegant code. (note it returns the number of each coin to use rather than repeating the actual coin ammount n times).

public class CoinPerm {


@Test
public void QuickTest() throws Exception
{
    int ammount = 15;
    int coins[] = {1,6,7};

    ArrayList<solution> solutionList = SolvePerms(ammount, coins);

    for (solution sol : solutionList)
    {
        System.out.println(sol);
    }

    assertTrue("Wrong number of solutions " + solutionList.size(),solutionList.size()  == 6);
}



public ArrayList<solution>  SolvePerms(int ammount, int coins[]) throws Exception
{
    ArrayList<solution> solutionList = new ArrayList<solution>();
    ArrayList<Integer> emptyList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    solution CurrentSolution = new solution(emptyList);
    GetPerms(ammount, coins, CurrentSolution, solutionList);

    return solutionList;
}


private void GetPerms(int ammount, int coins[], solution CurrentSolution,   ArrayList<solution> mSolutions) throws Exception
{
    int currentCoin = coins[0];

    if (currentCoin <= 0)
    {
        throw new Exception("Cant cope with negative or zero ammounts");
    }

    if (coins.length == 1)
    {
        if (ammount % currentCoin == 0)
        {
            CurrentSolution.add(ammount/currentCoin);
            mSolutions.add(CurrentSolution);
        }
        return;
    }

    // work out list with one less coin.
    int coinsDepth = coins.length;
    int reducedCoins[] = new int[(coinsDepth -1 )];
    for (int j = 0; j < coinsDepth - 1;j++)
    {
        reducedCoins[j] = coins[j+1];
    }


    // integer rounding okay;
    int numberOfPerms = ammount / currentCoin;

    for (int j = 0; j <= numberOfPerms; j++)
    {
        solution newSolution =  CurrentSolution.clone();
        newSolution.add(j);
        GetPerms(ammount - j * currentCoin,reducedCoins, newSolution, mSolutions ); 
    }
}


private class solution 
{
    ArrayList<Integer> mNumberOfCoins;

    solution(ArrayList<Integer> anumberOfCoins)
    {
        mNumberOfCoins = anumberOfCoins;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        if (mNumberOfCoins != null && mNumberOfCoins.size() > 0)
        {
            String retval = mNumberOfCoins.get(0).toString();
            for (int i = 1; i< mNumberOfCoins.size();i++)
            {
                retval += ","+mNumberOfCoins.get(i).toString();
            }
            return retval;
        }
        else
        {
            return "";
        }
    }

    @Override
    protected solution clone() 
    {
        return new solution((ArrayList<Integer>) mNumberOfCoins.clone());
    }

    public void add(int i) {
        mNumberOfCoins.add(i);
    }
}

}

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Aryabhatta’s answer for counting the number of ways to make change with coins of fixed denominations is very cute but also impractical to implement as described. Rather than use complex numbers, we’ll use modular arithmetic, similar to how the number-theoretic transform replaces a Fourier transform for multiplying integer polynomials.

Let D be the least common multiple of the coin denominations. By Dirichlet’s theorem on arithmetic progressions, there exist infinitely many prime numbers p such that D divides p - 1. (With any luck, they’ll even be distributed in a way such that we can find them efficiently.) We’ll compute the number of ways modulo some p satisfying this condition. By obtaining a crude bound somehow (e.g., n + k - 1 choose k - 1 where n is the total and k is the number of denominations), repeating this procedure with several different primes whose product exceeds that bound, and applying the Chinese remainder theorem, we can recover the exact number.

Test candidates 1 + k*D for integers k > 0 until we find a prime p. Let g be a primitive root modulo p (generate candidates at random and apply the standard test). For each denomination d, express the polynomial x**d - 1 modulo p as a product of factors:

x**d - 1 = product from i=0 to d-1 of (x - g**((p-1)*i/d)) [modulo p].

Note that d divides D divides p-1, so the exponent indeed is an integer.

Let m be the sum of denominations. Gather all of the constants g**((p-1)*i/d) as a(0), ..., a(m-1). The next step is to find a partial fraction decomposition A(0), ..., A(m-1) such that

sign / product from j=0 to m-1 of (a(j) - x) =
    sum from j=0 to m-1 of A(j)/(a(j) - x) [modulo p],

where sign is 1 if there are an even number of denominations and -1 if there are an odd number of denominations. Derive a system of linear equations for A(j) by evaluating both sides of the given equation for different values of x, then solve it with Gaussian elimination. The system will be singular if a(j1) = a(j2) for distinct j1, j2, which we handle by forcing the coefficient of all but one duplicate to zero.

Given this setup, we can compute the number of ways (modulo p, of course) to make change amounting to n as

sum from j=0 to m-1 of A(j) * (1/a(j))**(n+1).
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public static void main(String[] args) {

    int b,c,total = 15;
    int combos =1;
        for(int d=0;d<total/7;d++)
           {
             b = total - d * 7;
            for (int n = 0; n <= b /6; n++)
        {
                    combos++;

        }

        }

      System.out.print("TOTAL COMBINATIONS  = "+combos);
}
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2  
might want to offer some description –  andersoj May 10 '12 at 1:35

The same problem for coins(1,5,10,25,50) has one of below solutions. The solution should satisfy below equation: 1*a + 5*b + 10*c + 25*d + 50*e == cents

public static void countWaysToProduceGivenAmountOfMoney(int cents) {

    for(int a = 0;a<=cents;a++){
        for(int b = 0;b<=cents/5;b++){
            for(int c = 0;c<=cents/10;c++){
                for(int d = 0;d<=cents/25;d++){
                    for(int e = 0;e<=cents/50;e++){
                        if(1*a + 5*b + 10*c + 25*d + 50*e == cents){
                            System.out.println("1 cents :"+a+", 5 cents:"+b+", 10 cents:"+c);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

This can be modified for any general solutions.

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1  
You sir might just need to understand concept of general solution!!!!!!! –  SSR Apr 7 '13 at 17:50

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