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I have a small tray application which registers a system-wide hotkey. When the user selects a text anywhere in any application and presses this hotkey I want to be able to capture the selected text. I'm currently doing this using AutomationElements:

//Using FocusedElement (since the focused element should be the control with the selected text?)
AutomationElement ae = AutomationElement.FocusedElement;        
AutomationElement txtElement = ae.FindFirst(TreeScope.Subtree,Condition.TrueCondition);
if(txtElement == null)
    return;

TextPattern tp;

try
{
    tp = txtElement.GetCurrentPattern(TextPattern.Pattern) as TextPattern;
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    return;
}

TextPatternRange[] trs;

if (tp.SupportedTextSelection == SupportedTextSelection.None)
{
    return;
            }
else
{
    trs = tp.GetSelection();
    string selectedText = trs[0].GetText(-1);
    MessageBox.Show(selectedText );

}

This works for some apps (such as notepad, visual studios edit boxes and such) but not for all (such as Word, FireFox, Chrome, and so on.)

Anyone here with any ideas of how to be able to retreive the selected text in ANY application?

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Despite what's said below, remember that the clipboard only gets filled if the application implements Ctrl-C (or whatever); the clipboard is not a solution –  smirkingman Nov 22 '10 at 12:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, there's no way to get the selected text from any arbitrary application. UI Automation works if the application supports UIA TextPattern; unfortunately, most do not. I wrote an application that tried to do this, and had a bunch of fallbacks.

I tried (pretty much in order):

  1. UIA.TextPattern
  2. Internet Explorer-specific (this had different implementations for IE 6,7,8,9)
  3. Adobe Reader-specific
  4. Clipboard

This covered 80-90% of the applications out there, but there were quite a few that still failed.

Note that restoring the clipboard has problems of its own; some applications (Office, etc.) put vendor-specific information into the clipboard that can have pointers into internal data; when you put your own info on the clipboard, the internal data gets released, and when you put the old data back, the clipboard now points to freed data, resulting in crashes. You could work around this somewhat by only saving/restoring known clipboard formats, but again, that results in odd behavior in that apps behave "wrong" instead of crashing.

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How did the Adobe Reader specific implementation work out? If you have any details, let me know. –  Marcel N. Apr 22 at 9:48

Is it possible to look at the clipboard and make your hotkey: CTRL+C ?

You won't be able to read selected text from any application. For example some PDF files have protected content that disallows copies.

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UIA technology does not supported by all applications, you can try to use MSAA in some cases (like FF, Chrome, etc.) but you still will get many problems. The best way is to save current clipboard text, send "CTRL + C" keypress message via SendMessage WinAPI function, get clipboard text, and restore initial clipboard text as Rick said.

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1  
The clipboard connects would need to be saved, and then put back afterwords. This is not always easy. –  Ian Ringrose Nov 22 '10 at 11:15
    
I tried your approach but I failed to capture selected text from Office Word. :( stackoverflow.com/questions/25281314/… –  ChienND Aug 13 at 8:21

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