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HI,

How to do Bitwise AND(&) on CString values in MFC(VC++)? Example :

CString NASServerIP = "172.24.15.25";
CString  SystemIP = " 142.25.24.85";
CString strSubnetMask = "255.255.255.0";

int result1 = NASServerIP & strSubnetMask;
int result2 = SystemIP & strSubnetMask;

if(result1==result2)
{
    cout << "Both in Same network";
}
else
{
    cout << "not in same network";
}

How i can do bitwise AND on CString values ? Its giving error as "'CString' does not define this operator or a conversion to a type acceptable to the predefined operator"

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You don't. Peforming a bitwise-AND on two strings doesn't make a lot of sense. You need to obtain binary representations of the IP address strings, then you can perform whatever bitwise operations on them. This can be easily done by first obtaining a const char* from a CString then passing it to the inet_addr() function.

A (simple) example based on your code snippet.

CString NASServerIP = "172.24.15.25";
CString  SystemIP = " 142.25.24.85";
CString strSubnetMask = "255.255.255.0";

// CStrings can be casted into LPCSTRs (assuming the CStrings are not Unicode)
unsigned long NASServerIPBin = inet_addr((LPCSTR)NASServerIP);
unsigned long SystemIPBin = inet_addr((LPCSTR)SystemIP);
unsigned long strSubnetMaskBin = inet_addr((LPCSTR)strSubnetMask);

// Now, do whatever is needed on the unsigned longs.
int result1 = NASServerIPBin & strSubnetMaskBin;
int result2 = SystemIPBin & strSubnetMaskBin;

if(result1==result2)
{
    cout << "Both in Same network";
}
else
{
    cout << "Not in same network";
}

The bytes in the unsigned longs are "reversed" from the string representation. For example, if your IP address string is 192.168.1.1, the resulting binary from inet_addr would be 0x0101a8c0, where:

  • 0x01 = 1
  • 0x01 = 1
  • 0xa8 = 168
  • 0xc0 = 192

This shouldn't affect your bitwise operations, however.

You of course need to include the WinSock header (#include <windows.h> is usually sufficient, since it includes winsock.h) and link against the WinSock library (wsock32.lib if you're including winsock.h).

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@In silico : Pls provide some sample. –  Swapnil Gupta Nov 22 '10 at 9:44
    
@Swapnil Gupta: It should be easy to figure out based on the inet_addr() documentation and the Stack Overflow question/answer I linked. However, I've added a few lines. –  In silico Nov 22 '10 at 9:57
    
@In silico : Using this approach i can find out whether the two IP Addresses are in same network or not ? –  Swapnil Gupta Nov 22 '10 at 10:09
    
@Swapnil Gupta: I woudn't suggest using inet_addr if it's useless for what you want to do in your question. –  In silico Nov 22 '10 at 10:12
    
@In silico: Then what will be the gud approach for doing this ? –  Swapnil Gupta Nov 22 '10 at 10:15
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