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this is my problem: I'm writing an alternative contacts app which is specified to work with A LOT of different languages and alphabets. When querying names in my own language, Swedish, the names using umlaut characters are sorted in an illogical manner to me, but logical to unicode i suppose:

Should be/Swedish style: A, B, C, ..., Z, Å, Ä, Ö.

Query result: A, Å, Ä, B, ..., N, O, Ö, P, ...

I assume this will be a problem in any language that deviates from the latin alphabet. All tests I've made are on the emulator. My dev group are making changes to the framework so low-level answers are welcome as well.

Uri uri = ContactsContract.Contacts.CONTENT_URI;
String[] projection = new String[] {
       ContactsContract.Contacts._ID,
       ContactsContract.Contacts.DISPLAY_NAME,
       ContactsContract.Contacts.PHOTO_ID
       };
String selection = ContactsContract.Contacts.IN_VISIBLE_GROUP + " = '1'";
String sortOrder = ContactsContract.Contacts.DISPLAY_NAME + " COLLATE LOCALIZED ASC";
mCursor = managedQuery(uri, projection, null, null, sortOrder);

Update: we're currently investigating this track: Sort a String array, TBC... I also added it as an issue on Google Code.

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1  
Are you sure the device has correct locale settings? Try using SQLiteDatabase.setLocale –  Mikpa Nov 22 '10 at 13:29
1  
Well the database is managed by the Android system, and setLocale(Locale l) isn't a static function. As I'm interpreting the doc (2.2) the collator LOCALIZED is supposed to be able to manage this sorting - but they don't have any documentation on it (the doc says, XXX a link needed! :P ) –  emolaus Nov 22 '10 at 14:16

1 Answer 1

Gaah. It appears it's like this:

running the following code in vanilla Java (SE-1.6) generates the desired output:

String strings[] = {"Åke", "Äskil", "Otto", "Adam", "Örjan", "Palle", "Nisse"};
Locale locale = new Locale("sv", "SE");
Collator collator = java.text.Collator.getInstance(locale);
java.util.Arrays.sort(strings, collator);

But the very same code in Android does NOT work for me.

Edit: I made an issue out of this on the Android Google Code site, it's been commented by a reviewer.

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