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I have a menu that asks for the user to pick one of the options. Since this menu is from 1 to 10, I'm using input besides raw_input.

My code as an if statement that if the number the user inputs is from 1 to 10 it does the option. If the user inputs any number besides that ones, the else statement says to the user pick a number from 1 to 10.

The problem is if the user types an string, lets say for example qwert. It gives me an error because its an string. I understand why and I don want to use raw_input.

What can I do to wen the user types a string it goes to my else statement and print for example "Only numbers are valid. Pick a number from 1 to 10"

I don't want to use any advanced programing to do this

Regards,

Favolas

EDIT Thanks for all your answers and sorry for the late response but I had some health problems.

I couldn't use try or except because my teacher didn't allow it. In the end, I've used raw_input because it was the simplest alternative but was glad to see that are many ways to solve this problem.

Regards,

Favolas

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closed as not a real question by katrielalex, SilentGhost, Jochen Ritzel, aaronasterling, Graviton Nov 23 '10 at 6:18

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
have you tried try, except statements? –  crodjer Nov 22 '10 at 13:07
    
I would dare say that try,except is not advanced programming, and is really the only logical choice if you don't want to have to test for all possible types of input and to handle them individually. –  snarkyname77 Nov 22 '10 at 13:43
9  
-1 This stopped being a valid question when you said you didn't want to use try... except blocks. That's like asking how to print the numbers from one to ten without using a loop. The point of exception handling is to give the programmer the ability to, well, handle exceptions. What do you have against them? –  katrielalex Nov 22 '10 at 14:08
    
@katrielalex: I'm afraid I have disagree with about whether this is a valid question -- as I do with the analogy you used about printing the numbers from 1-10 without a loop -- because both are possible, although it's hard to imagine a reason why anyone would want to do it that way except perhaps in some special context such as a lambda or generator expression. –  martineau Nov 22 '10 at 15:18
    
If you do not want to use raw_input (Python 2.x) or input (Python 3.x) and if you do not want to use try / except clauses, you might want to check my second answer. Instead of raising exceptions, None is returned from special functions when they detect an error. –  Noctis Skytower Nov 22 '10 at 15:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can throw an exception when you try to convert your string into a number. Example:

try:
   int(myres)
except:
   print "Only numbers are valid"
share|improve this answer

You should use raw_input(), even if you don't want to :) This will always give you a string. You can then use code like

s = raw_input()
try:
    choice = int(s)
except ValueError:
    #  choice is invalid...

to try to convert to an int.

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thanks for the answer but I don't want to use try or except –  Favolas Nov 22 '10 at 13:33
2  
@Favolas: Get over it. –  martineau Nov 22 '10 at 15:28

What you really are after is how to figure out if something could pass as an integer. The following would do the job:

try:
    i = int(string_from_input)
ecxept ValueError:
    # actions in case the input is anything other than int, like continuing the loop
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the answer but I don't want to use try or except –  Favolas Nov 22 '10 at 13:33
1  
Are you sure? It is the best solution. Another option would be to use the 'isdigit()' function on string objects. If the string contains only digits, ie. no ',' or '.' it will return true. –  knutin Nov 22 '10 at 13:58

Im not sure what you consider advanced - a simple way to do it would be with something like this.

def getUserInput():
    while True:
        a = raw_input("Enter a number between 1 and 10: ")
        try:
            number = int(a)
            if (0 < number <= 10):
                return number
            else:
                print "Between 1 and 10 please"
        except:
            print "Im sorry, please enter a number between 1 and 10"

Here, I have used try/except statements, to ensure that the entered string can be converted to an integer. And a loop (which will keep running) until the entered number is between 1 and 10 (0< number <=10)

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thanks for the answer but I don't want to use try or except –  Favolas Nov 22 '10 at 13:35

You clearly have something against exception handling. I don't understand why -- it's a fundamental part of (not just Python) programming and something you should be comfortable with. It's no more 'advanced' than handling error codes, just a different mentality.

Here are the docs. It's pretty simple:

It is possible to write programs that handle selected exceptions. Look at the following example, which asks the user for input until a valid integer has been entered, but allows the user to interrupt the program (using Control-C or whatever the operating system supports); note that a user-generated interruption is signalled by raising the KeyboardInterrupt exception.

>>> while True:
...     try:
...         x = int(raw_input("Please enter a number: "))
...         break
...     except ValueError:
...         print "Oops!  That was no valid number.  Try again..."
...

The try statement works as follows.

First, the try clause (the statement(s) between the try and except keywords) is executed. If no exception occurs, the except clause is skipped and execution of the try statement is finished. If an exception occurs during execution of the try clause, the rest of the clause is skipped. Then if its type matches the exception named after the except keyword, the except clause is executed, and then execution continues after the try statement. If an exception occurs which does not match the exception named in the except clause, it is passed on to outer try statements; if no handler is found, it is an unhandled exception and execution stops with a message as shown above. A try statement may have more than one except clause, to specify handlers for different exceptions. At most one handler will be executed. Handlers only handle exceptions that occur in the corresponding try clause, not in other handlers of the same try statement. An except clause may name multiple exceptions as a parenthesized tuple, for example:

... except (RuntimeError, TypeError, NameError):
...     pass

The last except clause may omit the exception name(s), to serve as a wildcard. Use this with extreme caution, since it is easy to mask a real programming error in this way! It can also be used to print an error message and then re-raise the exception (allowing a caller to handle the exception as well):

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Personally, I liked my first answer better. However, this one should fit your requirements with more code.

import sys

def get_number(a, z):
    if a > z:
        a, z = z, a
    while True:
        line = get_line('Please enter a number: ')
        if line is None:
            sys.exit()
        if line:
            number = str_to_int(line)
            if number is None:
                print('You must enter base 10 digits.')
            elif a <= number <= z:
                return number
            else:
                print('Your number must be in this range:', a, '-', z)
        else:
            print('You must enter a number.')

def get_line(prompt):
    sys.stdout.write(prompt)
    sys.stdout.flush()
    line = sys.stdin.readline()
    if line:
        return line[:-1]

def str_to_int(string):
    zero = ord('0')
    integer = 0
    for character in string:
        if '0' <= character <= '9':
            integer *= 10
            integer += ord(character) - zero
        else:
            return
    return integer
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3  
Do you need this code converted into one function or so that it does not use any functions? –  Noctis Skytower Nov 23 '10 at 1:21

May I recommend using this function in Python 3.1? The two arguments are the expected number range.

def get_number(a, z):
    if a > z:
        a, z = z, a
    while True:
        try:
            line = input('Please enter a number: ')
        except EOFError:
            raise SystemExit()
        else:
            if line:
                try:
                    number = int(line)
                    assert a <= number <= z
                except ValueError:
                    print('You must enter base 10 digits.')
                except AssertionError:
                    print('Your number must be in this range:', a, '-', z)
                else:
                    return number
            else:
                print('You must enter a number.')
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the answer but I don't want to use try or except –  Favolas Nov 22 '10 at 13:36
2  
@favolas: why this random requirement? what's wrong with try-except? –  SilentGhost Nov 22 '10 at 13:58

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