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I decided to try project euler problem 17 today, and I quickly wrote a pretty fast code in C++ to solve it. However, for some reason, the result is wrong. The question is:

If the numbers 1 to 5 are written out in words: one, two, three, four, five, then there are 3 + 3 + 5 + 4 + 4 = 19 letters used in total.

If all the numbers from 1 to 1000 (one thousand) inclusive were written out in words, how many letters would be used?

NOTE: Do not count spaces or hyphens. For example, 342 (three hundred and forty-two) contains 23 letters and 115 (one hundred and fifteen) contains 20 letters. The use of "and" when writing out numbers is in compliance with British usage.

I seriously don't know why, as I have checked every part of my program thoroughly and I can't find anything wrong. The only thing bad I could find is when checking for 1000, my while loop doesn't check correctly. I fixed that by lowering the limit of my while loop to <1000 instead of <1001 and just added 11(onethousand = 11) manually to the sum. And yet, it doesn't work. I would really appreciate it if you could tell me what's wrong. I'm sure my code is pretty bad, but it's something done in a few minutes. So here it is:

int getDigit (int x, int y)
{
 return (x / (int)pow(10.0, y)) % 10;
}

int main()
{
 string dictionary[10] = { "zero", "one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight", "nine" };
 string dictionary2[18] = { "ten", "eleven", "twelve", "thirteen", "fourteen", "fifteen", "sixteen", "seventeen", "eighteen", "nineteen", "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty", "sixty", "seventy", "eighty", "ninety" };
 string dictionary3[10] = { "onehundred", "twohundred", "threehundred", "fourhundred", "fivehundred", "sixhundred", "sevenhundred", "eighthundred", "ninehundred", "onethousand" };

 int i = 1;
 int last;
 int first;
 int middle;

 _int64 sumofletters = 0;

 while (i < 10)     //OK
 {
  sumofletters += dictionary[i].length();

  i++;
 }

 cout << sumofletters << endl;

 while (i < 20)     //OK
 {
  last = i % 10;

  sumofletters += dictionary2[last].length();

  i++;
 }

 while (i < 100)     //OK 
 {
  first = (i / 10) + 8;
  last = i % 10;

  if (last != 0)
  {
   sumofletters += dictionary2[first].length() + dictionary[last].length();
  }

  else
   sumofletters += dictionary2[first].length();

  i++;
 }

 cout << sumofletters << endl;

 while (i < 1000)       //OK
 {
  last = i % 10;
  first = (i / 100) - 1;
  middle = (getDigit(i, 1)) + 8;

  if (middle != 0 && last != 0)   //OK
  {
   if (middle == 1)
    sumofletters += dictionary3[first].length() + dictionary2[last].length() + 3;
   else
    sumofletters += dictionary3[first].length() + dictionary2[middle].length() + dictionary[last].length() + 3;
  }

  else if (last == 0 && middle != 0)  //OK
  {
   if (middle == 1)
    sumofletters += dictionary3[first].length() + 6;
   else
    sumofletters += dictionary3[first].length() + dictionary2[middle].length() + 3;
  }

  else if (middle == 0 && last != 0)   //OK
   sumofletters += dictionary3[first].length() + dictionary[last].length() + 3;

  else
   sumofletters += dictionary3[first].length();

  i++;
 }

 sumofletters += 11;

 cout << sumofletters << endl;

 return 0;
}
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1  
For those who are not familiar with Project Euler problem 17, you could explain what it is or at least give a link. You can't expect people to tell you where the problem is if they don't know what the program should do. –  ereOn Nov 22 '10 at 13:25
    
Oh yeah.. forgot about that. Edited :P –  Lockhead Nov 22 '10 at 13:27
2  
I suggest you solve your computing puzzle in a computing fashion: get the output in a form that can be easily verified - print out the textual description of each number, along with your calculation of the number of letters, then have a look through and do a sanity check, particularly on the more unusual cases. –  Tony D Nov 22 '10 at 13:37
    
Thanks..but.. isn't that basically the same as what I did just in reversed order? If it isn't, still, I'm very interested to see what's wrong with my current code - to save future problems. –  Lockhead Nov 22 '10 at 13:41
6  
Instead of string literals why not just use the lengths of the strings, furthermore, if you cache the lengths of all numbers from 1-99, you can then reuse them for the next 9 100s values - though this is not necessarily a DP problem. –  Matthieu N. Nov 22 '10 at 19:11
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem appears to be with this line:

middle = (getDigit(i, 1)) + 8; 

You add 8 to this number - presumably to act as an offset into your dictionary2 - but in the following if statements, you have cases where it needs to be 0. Those can never be satisfied unless getDigit would return -8.

Instead of adding your offset there, add it when you need it - or better still, don't store those things in the same dictionary.

Even better would be a completely different structure: write a function which generates the string for a number, and then take the length of that string for your counting. This will also make it much easier to debug problems like this, because you can see the actual string you're taking the length of.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It works now. :D –  Lockhead Nov 22 '10 at 15:29
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Rather than doing your work for you:

Split it up in to smaller functions. Then you can test each function independently.

Write some unit tests then if you need to, or just use a debugger and step through and do it also on a bit of paper and see where you and your code diverge.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Splitting up and testing parts catches these kind of errors in almost all instances. –  daramarak Nov 22 '10 at 13:57
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fourty is mispelt and should be forty.

Check your comparisons middle == 0 / middle != 0 / middle = 0. Go look back at where you calculate middle. That's wrong.

Fixing both of those gets the right answer.

share|improve this answer
    
The result is still incorrect =[ –  Lockhead Nov 22 '10 at 13:30
    
+1. But so unfair for someone whose english is not fluent ! ;) –  ereOn Nov 22 '10 at 13:31
    
Added second fix and it gets the correct answer now. –  marcog Nov 22 '10 at 13:46
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