Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a problem, I need to compare two inputstreams fast.

Today I have a function like this:

private boolean isEqual(InputStream i1, InputStream i2) throws IOException {

    try {
        // do the compare
        while (true) {
            int fr = i1.read();
            int tr = i2.read();

            if (fr != tr)
                return false;

            if (fr == -1)
                return true;
        }

    } finally {
        if (i1 != null)
            i1.close();
        if (i2 != null)
            i2.close();
    }
}

But it's really slow. I want to use buffered reads but have not come up with a good way of doing it.

Some extra stuff that makes it harder:

  • I don't want to read one of the input streams into memory (the whole one)
  • I don't want to use a third party library

I need a practial solution - code! :)

share|improve this question
    
I don't think you can compare anything without reading it into memory. Do you actually mean reading the whole inputstream into memory, meaning reading a fixed number of bytes is ok? –  Patrick Nov 22 '10 at 13:36
    
I meant reading the whole inputstream into memory is not an option –  dacwe Nov 22 '10 at 13:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Something like this may do:

private static boolean isEqual(InputStream i1, InputStream i2)
        throws IOException {

    ReadableByteChannel ch1 = Channels.newChannel(i1);
    ReadableByteChannel ch2 = Channels.newChannel(i2);

    ByteBuffer buf1 = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(1024);
    ByteBuffer buf2 = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(1024);

    try {
        while (true) {

            int n1 = ch1.read(buf1);
            int n2 = ch2.read(buf2);

            if (n1 == -1 || n2 == -1) return n1 == n2;

            buf1.flip();
            buf2.flip();

            for (int i = 0; i < Math.min(n1, n2); i++)
                if (buf1.get() != buf2.get())
                    return false;

            buf1.compact();
            buf2.compact();
        }

    } finally {
        if (i1 != null) i1.close();
        if (i2 != null) i2.close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like it. NIO ftw :) –  Patrick Nov 22 '10 at 13:40
    
Bang on target! –  dacwe Nov 22 '10 at 13:41
    
@dacwe, I can guarentee its slower than the solution I provided. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Nov 22 '10 at 13:42
1  
allocateDirect should give you a "direct bytebuffer" (with a native low-level implementation) which is supposed to be faster than an ordinary bytebuffer. –  aioobe Nov 22 '10 at 13:43
    
@Peter Lawrey, are you sure? You're using a byte array managed by the JVM, with a direct bytebuffer you get one step closer to the silicon :-) –  aioobe Nov 22 '10 at 13:44

By far my favorite is to use the IOUtils helper class from the Apache Commons IO library:

IOUtils.contentEquals( is1, is2 );
share|improve this answer

Using buffered reads is just a matter of wrapping the InputStreams with BufferedInputStreams. However you are likely to get the best performance reading large blocks at a time.

private boolean isEqual(InputStream i1, InputStream i2) throws IOException {
    byte[] buf1 = new byte[64 *1024];
    byte[] buf2 = new byte[64 *1024];
    try {
        DataInputStream d2 = new DataInputStream(i2);
        int len;
        while ((len = i1.read(buf1)) > 0) {
            d2.readFully(buf2,0,len);
            for(int i=0;i<len;i++)
              if(buf1[i] != buf2[i]) return false;
        }
        return d2.read() < 0; // is the end of the second file also.
    } catch(EOFException ioe) {
        return false;
    } finally {
        i1.close();
        i2.close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So, how do I do that - e.g. a practial solution? –  dacwe Nov 22 '10 at 13:32
    
@dacwe: Allocate two byte buffers byte[] buf1 = new byte[BlockSize]; byte[] buf2 = new byte[BlockSize]; and compare buf1 and buf2 after you read into those two buffers from i1 and i2. –  Patrick Nov 22 '10 at 13:34
    
@patrick, Peter Lawrey: Well, that's not that easy.. :) sfussenegger thought that he had it, but he's also wrong. –  dacwe Nov 22 '10 at 13:37
    
@dacwe see added code. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 22 '10 at 13:38
    
@dacwe, what's not that easy? –  Peter Lawrey Nov 22 '10 at 13:39

why not simply wrap both streams at the very beginning of your method:

i1 = new BufferedInputStream(i1);
i2 = new BufferedInputStream(i2);

Alternatively, you could simply try reading both streams into a buffer:

public static boolean equals(InputStream i1, InputStream i2, int buf) throws IOException {
    try {
        // do the compare
        while (true) {
            byte[] b1 = new byte[buf];
            byte[] b2 = new byte[buf];

            int length = i1.read(b1);
            if (length == -1) {
                return i2.read(b2, 0, 1) == -1;
            }

            try {
                StreamUtils.readFully(i2, b2, 0, length);
            } catch (EOFException e) {
                // i2 is shorter than i1
                return false;
            }

            if (!ArrayUtils.equals(b1, b2, 0, length)) {
                return false;
            }
        }
    } finally {
        // simply close streams and ignore (log) exceptions
        StreamUtils.close(i1, i2);
    }
}

// StreamUtils.readFully(..) 
public static void readFully(InputStream in, byte[] b, int off, int len) throws EOFException, IOException {
    while (len > 0) {
        int read = in.read(b, off, len);
        if (read == -1) {
            throw new EOFException();
        }
        off += read;
        len -= read;
    }
}

// ArrayUtils.equals(..)
public static boolean equals(byte[] a, byte[] a2, int off, int len) {
    if (off < 0 || len < 0 || len > a.length - off || len > a2.length - off) {
        throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException();
    } else if (len == 0) {
        return true;
    }

    if (a == a2) {
        return true;
    }
    if (a == null || a2 == null) {
        return false;
    }

    for (int i = off; i < off + len; i++) {
        if (a[i] != a2[i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

EDIT: I've fixed my implementation now. That's how it looks like without DataInputStream or NIO. Code is available at GitHub or from Sonatype's OSS Snapshot Repository Maven:

<dependency>
  <groupId>at.molindo</groupId>
  <artifactId>molindo-utils</artifactId>
  <version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
</dependency>
share|improve this answer
    
Generally, this won't work because of comparing atomic reads... –  khachik Nov 22 '10 at 13:35
1  
read method is not specified for that (could return not reading full input!) –  dacwe Nov 22 '10 at 13:36
    
Also, is it predictable what contains say b1[1023] if length=100? –  khachik Nov 22 '10 at 13:38
    
I couldn't find "Arrays.equals(b1, b2, 0, length)" –  Peter Lawrey Nov 22 '10 at 13:40
    
@dacwe I've noticed this myself. That's why I added the FIXME comment - work in progress ;) @khachik What do you mean by atomic reads? @peter Arrays.equals(..) actually is a private utility library I'm using, my fault, though it was in java.util.Arrays ... gonna add it –  sfussenegger Nov 22 '10 at 13:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.