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What characters can I use in an identifier for an HTML element?

For example:

<SPAN id="section[5]" ...>

(Or rather, should I stick to certain characters to make sure the id works across all major browsers/JavaScript engine).

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marked as duplicate by Knu, Jeremy J Starcher, Cristik, PartiallyFinite, Mark Rotteveel May 27 at 6:28

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In HTML5, the only restrictions are that the ID must be unique within the document, contain at least one character and contain no spaces. See http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/REC-html5-20141028/dom.html#the-id-attribute

As other answers have pointed out, HTML 4 is more restrictive and specifies that

ID and NAME tokens must begin with a letter ([A-Za-z]) and may be followed by any number of letters, digits ([0-9]), hyphens ("-"), underscores ("_"), colons (":"), and periods (".").

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+1 This is the only complete answer so far. –  Mathias Bynens Jul 6 '11 at 6:34

In HTML 4, the id attribute holds a NAME token which are defined:

ID and NAME tokens must begin with a letter ([A-Za-z]) and may be followed by any number of letters, digits ([0-9]), hyphens ("-"), underscores ("_"), colons (":"), and periods (".").

As pointed out in a previous post, depending on your implementation you may have troubles with colons and periods along with others: What are valid values for the id attribute in HTML?

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1  
In HTML5, there are fewer restrictions: the ID must be unique within the document, contain at least one character and contain no spaces, and that's it. See w3.org/TR/html5/dom.html#the-id-attribute –  Tim Down Nov 22 '10 at 19:53
    
As @Tim Down said, HTML5 gets rid of most of these restrictions. See mathiasbynens.be/notes/html5-id-class, which also explains how to escape weird IDs (or other attribute values) for use in CSS and JavaScript. (I’ve also made a tool for that.) –  Mathias Bynens Jul 6 '11 at 6:32

From http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/types.html:

ID and NAME tokens must begin with a letter ([A-Za-z]) and may be followed by any number of letters, digits ([0-9]), hyphens ("-"), underscores ("_"), colons (":"), and periods (".").

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HTML5 gets rid of most of these restrictions. See mathiasbynens.be/notes/html5-id-class, which also explains how to escape weird IDs (or other attribute values) for use in CSS and JavaScript. (I’ve also made a tool for that.) –  Mathias Bynens Jul 6 '11 at 6:33

All the above answers + ID must be unique

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From the HTML4 specification:

ID and NAME tokens must begin with a letter ([A-Za-z]) and may be followed by any number of letters, digits ([0-9]), hyphens ("-"), underscores ("_"), colons (":"), and periods (".").

share|improve this answer
    
HTML5 gets rid of most of these restrictions. See mathiasbynens.be/notes/html5-id-class, which also explains how to escape weird IDs (or other attribute values) for use in CSS and JavaScript. (I’ve also made a tool for that.) –  Mathias Bynens Jul 6 '11 at 6:33

actually I can successfully use a ° too for example

< span id= "test°" />

Seems to be allowed, and I have no problem with jQuery or other ways to fetch dom elements via the selectors. Perhaps other chars work, but I didn't test them all.

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