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Given two circles:

  • C1 at (x1, y1) with radius1
  • C2 at (x2, y2) with radius2

How do you calculate the area of their intersection? All standard math functions (sin, cos, etc.) are available, of course.

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Thanks. I was actually aware of the link before posting. I was actually looking for a specific equation using the variables I listed. –  Chris Redford Nov 22 '10 at 19:24

3 Answers 3

You might want to check out this analytical solution and apply the formula with your input values.

Another Formula given here -

Area = r^2*(q - sin(q))  where q = 2*acos(c/2r),
where c = distance between centers and r is the common radius.
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+1 First link has full derivation of the formula. The second one is useful if the radii of the circles are the same. –  eaj Nov 22 '10 at 17:09
    
Thanks for the links. Is there a more general formula that can be derived using specifically the variables I gave (e.g. not assuming a common radius)? –  Chris Redford Nov 22 '10 at 17:43
1  
It think the first link eq 14 gives you a general solution but I need to brush up maths to see what exactly is happening...also you might need more need more than radii of circles to find this also try this if helpful-2000clicks.com/MathHelp/… –  Vishal Nov 22 '10 at 17:56
    
Okay. I was hoping that there was a straightforward equation using the variables I listed. I'll try to look into eq 14 and find a way to substitute the variables I had into it. –  Chris Redford Nov 22 '10 at 18:37
up vote 15 down vote accepted

Okay, using the Wolfram link and Misnomer's cue to look at equation 14, I have derived the following Java solution using the variables I listed and the distance between the centers (which can trivially be derived from them):

Double r = radius1;
Double R = radius2;
Double d = distance;
if(R < r){
    // swap
    r = radius2;
    R = radius1;
}
Double part1 = r*r*Math.acos((d*d + r*r - R*R)/(2*d*r));
Double part2 = R*R*Math.acos((d*d + R*R - r*r)/(2*d*R));
Double part3 = 0.5*Math.sqrt((-d+r+R)*(d+r-R)*(d-r+R)*(d+r+R));

Double intersectionArea = part1 + part2 - part3;
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Post your meta-note in Meta meta.stackoverflow.com –  belisarius Nov 23 '10 at 0:44
    
Yeah, I checked there and there is already a thread where the officially up-voted answer is that it is good to come back and answer your own question. But it doesn't seem like most SO users actually follow that policy. No offense to Misnomer and I appreciate him trying to help. But, right now, he has 3 up-votes for giving me a link I already knew about before posting. I have done the hard work of translating the information in that link into code and only have 1 up-vote. I've seen this kind of crowd behavior repeatedly on SO and it baffles me. –  Chris Redford Nov 23 '10 at 13:14
    
@Chris..did you just downvote my answer because...you wanted yours to have more upvotes..now that baffles me..I won't argue your point..because it is kind of silly according to me...but anyways..please at least drop a comment explaining downvotes next time.. –  Vishal Nov 29 '10 at 20:49
    
Hey. No, I downvoted it because genuinely don't think it is the best answer. I think it is incomplete. I appreciate you trying to help. But I'm frustrated by the users of SO promoting incomplete answers and I want the more informative and complete answer to have more votes. –  Chris Redford Dec 7 '10 at 18:15
    
re: awarding points for self-answers - it makes it too easy to game the system. And philosophically it makes sense that you should only be rewarded when you provide value to others, not to yourself. Re: downvoting answers - imho, this should only be done when an answer is wrong or misleading. An answer that provides useful information, even if it's not exactly what you want, may still be useful to others. –  broofa Dec 11 '12 at 12:52

I know this is an old question, but in case it helps anyone else out, here is a Javascript function that does exactly what Chris was after:

function areaOfIntersection(x0, y0, r0, x1, y1, r1)
{
  var rr0 = r0 * r0;
  var rr1 = r1 * r1;
  var d = Math.sqrt((x1 - x0) * (x1 - x0) + (y1 - y0) * (y1 - y0));
  var phi = (Math.acos((rr0 + (d * d) - rr1) / (2 * r0 * d))) * 2;
  var theta = (Math.acos((rr1 + (d * d) - rr0) / (2 * r1 * d))) * 2;
  var area1 = 0.5 * theta * rr1 - 0.5 * rr1 * Math.sin(theta);
  var area2 = 0.5 * phi * rr0 - 0.5 * rr0 * Math.sin(phi);
  return area1 + area2;
}

However, this method will return NaN if one circle is completely inside the other, or they are not touching at all. A slightly different version that doesn't fail in these conditions is as follows:

function areaOfIntersection(x0, y0, r0, x1, y1, r1)
{
  var rr0 = r0 * r0;
  var rr1 = r1 * r1;
  var d = Math.sqrt((x1 - x0) * (x1 - x0) + (y1 - y0) * (y1 - y0));

  // Circles do not overlap
  if (d > r1 + r0)
  {
    return 0;
  }

  // Circle1 is completely inside circle0
  else if (d <= Math.abs(r0 - r1) && r0 >= r1)
  {
    // Return area of circle1
    return Math.PI * rr1;
  }

  // Circle0 is completely inside circle1
  else if (d <= Math.abs(r0 - r1) && r0 < r1)
  {
    // Return area of circle0
    return Math.PI * rr0;
  }

  // Circles partially overlap
  else
  {
    var phi = (Math.acos((rr0 + (d * d) - rr1) / (2 * r0 * d))) * 2;
    var theta = (Math.acos((rr1 + (d * d) - rr0) / (2 * r1 * d))) * 2;
    var area1 = 0.5 * theta * rr1 - 0.5 * rr1 * Math.sin(theta);
    var area2 = 0.5 * phi * rr0 - 0.5 * rr0 * Math.sin(phi);

    // Return area of intersection
    return area1 + area2;
  }
}

I wrote this function by reading the information found at the Math Forum. I found this clearer than the Wolfram MathWorld explanation.

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