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I'm wondering if there is a way to quickly reverse specific hunk of a commit.

I can generate a diff between two commits or HEAD to see the difference.

How do I reverse just one of those hunks (or better yet, a set of specific hunks)?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted
git checkout -p $REF -- path/to/file

Where $REF is a ref name or commit ID that specifies the commit you want to take the file state from. For example, to selectively revert changes made in the last commit, use HEAD^.

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2  
More precisely, that will let you selectively check out versions of content from the previous commit; changes between your current commit and the work tree will also be discarded. –  Jefromi Nov 22 '10 at 17:32
    
Yes I've done this that before. But this reverts back all the changes? I'm looking to revert back only some of the changes. –  dkinzer Nov 22 '10 at 17:32
    
@DKinzer: No, the -p option will let you interactively select hunks to apply to your working tree. –  cdhowie Nov 22 '10 at 17:33
2  
No problem. Note that a lot of git commits (add, checkout, reset, etc.) will take the -p option this way and will let you pick which hunks to act on. This is really handy when two hunks in the same file should go into different commits. –  cdhowie Nov 22 '10 at 17:36
1  
I'm new to git and so far only knew about -i for selectively choosing commits when doing a rebase. I think the -p option will be very useful to me. –  dkinzer Nov 22 '10 at 17:38

To recover a deleted file from a previous commit I used the answer here:

Restore a deleted file in a Git repo

git checkout <deleting_commit>^ -- <file_path>
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git difftool $REF -- /path/to/file

where $REF is a ref name or commit ID that specifies the commit you want to take the file state from. For example, to selectively revert changes made in the last commit, use HEAD^.

This question was already answered by @cdhowie, but I find it somewhat nicer to use an interactive difftool like meld to selectively restore old hunks/lines of code, especially if there is a newly-introduced, hard-to-find bug in the code.

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