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        if($('.navigation ul li ul').children().length === 1) {
            $('.navigation ul li ul li a').css({opacity:0.5});
        }
        else {
            $('.navigation ul li ul li:first-child a').addClass('first');
            $('.navigation ul li ul li:last-child a').addClass('last');
        }

Basically I want it so if the navigation has one <li> for it to do something else than if it has more than 1 <li> in the unordered list.

SAMPLE HTML:

<nav id="nav" class="navigation"><!--Start Navigation-->          
    <ul> 
        <li><a href="#">Sample Linkk</a>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="#">1 DropDown Item</a></li>
            </ul>
        </li>
        <li><a href="#">Sample Link 2</a>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="#">2 DropDown Items</a></li>
                <li><a href="#">2 DropDown Items</a></li>
            </ul>
        </li>
    </ul>
 </nav>
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3  
Can you post some example HTML as well? –  Richard Marskell - Drackir Nov 22 '10 at 18:50
    
Post some HTML. This code seems to be valid and ok. –  Zlatev Nov 22 '10 at 18:52
    
Edited the post –  Daryl Nov 22 '10 at 18:56
    
When you say "the navigation has one <li>" are you referring to each of the top level list items as "the navigation", or the whole menu? –  jball Nov 22 '10 at 19:02

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted
$('.navigation ul li ul').each(function(){
   if($(this).children().length === 1){
      $(this).find('a').css({opacity:0.5});
   }else{
      $('li:first a', $(this)).addClass('first');
      $('li:last a', $(this)).addClass('last');
   }
});

Not tested it but I think it will work

share|improve this answer
    
Yup, that worked. Ive never seen jquery like $('li:first a', $(this)) ... How does that work? –  Daryl Nov 22 '10 at 19:06
3  
@Daryl: The jQuery constructor accepts a 2nd parameter which can be used to override the context of the selection. so in this example, li:first a is relative to this. –  Sebastian Patane Masuelli Nov 22 '10 at 19:09

If you place the following alert in the code, it shows that its finding three children

alert($('.navigation ul li ul').children().length)

And, based on the selector you have specified that's correct. You are basically asking jQuery to find all nodes that match that criteria, and there are two nodes that match that criteria (having a total of three children)

The each function will do the trick, because for each ".navigation ul li ul" it will look at its children, at which point you will have full control to see how many children there are and do the rest of the work

$('.navigation ul li ul').each(function(){
  if($(this).children().length === 1){
    $(this).find('a').css({opacity:0.5});
  }else{
    $('li:first a', $(this)).addClass('first');
    $('li:last a', $(this)).addClass('last');
  }
 });
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1  
seems like someone beat me to it –  Salman Paracha Nov 22 '10 at 19:08

Are you missing an .each ?

 $('.navigation ul li ul').each(function(){
      if ($(this).children().length == 1) {
          // do A
      } else {
          // do B
      }
 });
share|improve this answer
    
Didn't seem to do the trick, but I believe you're right about the each. –  Daryl Nov 22 '10 at 19:03
    
Glad to see there's the correct answer above :) I knew we were on the right track with that one. Looks like the difference between mine and the correct answer is the === triple equals. I wonder why that makes a difference? Does '1' measure as 'true' for values greater than 1? (I suppose there's also the difference of the .find() method. Oh well, glad it works! –  Alex C Nov 22 '10 at 19:09

You are now saying the navigation has a ul with a li with a ul with exactly 1 child and not what youre saying below that you want. Also I think == is enough..

It is logically not working:

You're saying:

If at least one $('.navigation ul li ul') exists with exactly 1 child, then for ALL $('.navigation ul li ul li a') elements (so not only the ones in that belong to the match in the if condition) do the opacity thing.

You'll have to separate the elements first before applying the action.

share|improve this answer
    
What? thats not really an explanation. At least not in my language. –  Daryl Nov 22 '10 at 18:57
    
Sorry ill edit it some more, not much experience yet :) –  Lucas Moeskops Nov 22 '10 at 19:03
    
I see, care to give some advice in how to go about doing it the 'right way'? thanks for your response. –  Daryl Nov 22 '10 at 19:03
    
Alex C's approach should do I think :) –  Lucas Moeskops Nov 22 '10 at 19:06

Look at what happens when you do something like this:

console.log( $("#nav ul li ul").children() );

You get all the li's lumped into one jQuery object. This isn't what you want I don't think.

Try something like this

share|improve this answer

you need to iterate over you possible matches else you are applying once to all.

$('.navigation ul li').each(function(){


if($(this).children('ul').children('li').length === 1) {
            $(this).children('ul').children('li').children('a').css({opacity:0.5});
        }
        else {
            $(this).children('ul').children('li:first-child').children('a').addClass('first');
            $(this).children('ul').children('li:last-child').children(
              'a').addClass('last');
        }
});

and yes, it's messy but I'm feeling ill today

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