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Can somebody explain why the second class does not compile?

1 Compiles fine using javac and JDK 6 (Eclipse will complain this code)

public class SameSignatureMethods {
    public <T extends String> Boolean test()
    {
        return true;
    }

    public <T extends Character> Double test() 
    {
        return 1d;
    }
}

2 A little change to that example, and compilation fails with the following error:

name clash: <T>test() and <T>test() have the same erasure

The only change is return type on the method:

public class SameSignatureMethods {
    public <T extends String> Boolean test()
    {
        return true;
    }

    public <T extends Character> Boolean test() {
        return true;
    }
}

thats how main method for first class will look:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    SameSignatureMethods m = new SameSignatureMethods();
    System.out.println("m.<Character>test()=" + m.<Character>test());
    System.out.println("m.<String>test()=" + m.<String>test());
}
share|improve this question
    
Hmm, interesting one. Which compiler did you use? JDK or some IDE-builtin? The first one doesn't compile here in Eclipse 3.6 SR1 (which is correct). –  BalusC Nov 22 '10 at 19:47
    
java version "1.6.0_18" Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_18-b07) Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (build 16.0-b13, mixed mode) –  Yuriy Nov 22 '10 at 19:48
    
@BalusC The return type isn't part of the method signature, is it? The error message is strange though. –  extraneon Nov 22 '10 at 19:50
    
@extraneon: indeed, I was however in my (deleted) answer mislead by the fact that the OP mentioned that it compiled fine (while it shouldn't have compiled as well). –  BalusC Nov 22 '10 at 19:51
    
Out of curiosity, have you been through this on some real, production-grade code, or is it just you exploring the edges of the language? –  Bruno Reis Nov 22 '10 at 20:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

So, the JDK compiler compiles the first version but not the second, while the Eclipse compiler compiles neither of the two versions.

From the viewpoint of Java byte code, the first version contains two different methods (after type erasure), namely public java.lang.Boolean test() and public java.lang.Double test(), which is perfectly valid. The JDK compiler and the Eclipse compiler sometimes generate such methods when you override generic methods, but those are then marked as synthetic bridge methods.

The second version would contain two methods with the same signature (after type erasure), which is not allowed in Java byte code. Therefore the JDK compiler cannot generate such a class file. I just edited a class file with a hex editor to create a class with such methods, and upon starting the program, I get this error:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ClassFormatError: Duplicate method name&signature in class file SameSignatureMethods
    at java.lang.ClassLoader.defineClass1(Native Method)
    at java.lang.ClassLoader.defineClassCond(Unknown Source)
    at java.lang.ClassLoader.defineClass(Unknown Source)
    at java.security.SecureClassLoader.defineClass(Unknown Source)
    at java.net.URLClassLoader.defineClass(Unknown Source)
    at java.net.URLClassLoader.access$000(Unknown Source)
    at java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run(Unknown Source)
    at java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(Native Method)
    at java.net.URLClassLoader.findClass(Unknown Source)
    at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(Unknown Source)
    at sun.misc.Launcher$AppClassLoader.loadClass(Unknown Source)
    at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(Unknown Source)
Could not find the main class: SameSignatureMethods.  Program will exit.

The class I started with looks like this. I used String and Double because they have the same name length:

public class SameSignatureMethods {
    public  <T extends String> String test() {
        return null;
    }

    public  <T extends Double> Double test() {
        return null;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(new SameSignatureMethods().<Double>test());
    }
}

Then, using a hex editor, I changed the signature of the first method to public <T extends String> Double test(), in two places of the class file, one with the raw signature ()Ljava/lang/Double;, one with the generic signature <T:Ljava/lang/String;>()Ljava/lang/Double;.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you elaborate on that a little? I thought return type is not part of the signature –  Yuriy Nov 22 '10 at 21:49
1  
The return type is not part of the signature when compiling a class, since, as you know, for an invocation wich ignores the return value, the compiler could not choose. But in byte code, the return type IS part of the signature. You could test this by compiling two classes, one calling a method of the other, and then change only the return type of the called method. Compile that class but not the calling class, and run the program. You get a NoSuchMethodError. –  Christian Semrau Nov 22 '10 at 22:06
    
If I start the JVM with the byte code verifier disabled (not recommended!), the program runs and prints null, because the JVM invokes one of the two methods with identical signature. If I change the signatures of both methods to return String instead, the program fails with a NoSuchMethodError, because none of the two methods has the return type Double requested by the main method. –  Christian Semrau Nov 22 '10 at 22:25

Sounds like you have managed to confuse your compiler terribly:

  • Return type is not part of the signature. The compiler can't use return type to tell which method is being called.

  • In your example the generic stuff crammed into the method signature does not affect the return type anyway.

  • Also saying <T extends String> makes no sense, you can't extend a final type. (Hmm, this is just a warning, it does not stop compilation)

You wonder why the second class doesn't compile, I wonder why the first class compiles. As is, the first class compiles, albeit with a warning. Taking out the pointy bracket stuff results in a 'Duplicate Method' error that ought to appear regardless. Must be a compiler bug.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, it is actually purely theoretical question for me. It is as standard as it gets 1.6.0_18 compiler, and again - the fact that first class compiles makes perfect sense to me - it goes in accordance with Java spec. The second one not compiling - that what I don't undrestand –  Yuriy Nov 22 '10 at 20:59
1  
yes #1 compiles due to a compiler bug - see: bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6182950 - it no longer compiles in JDK7 (or Eclipse 3.6+, as they corrected this too) –  Joshua McKinnon Nov 22 '10 at 22:38

In the first class (SameSignatureMethods), the 2 methods at runtime return Boolean and Double, respectively. In the second class the methods both return Boolean.

<T extends String> in front of a method definition does not mean that it is a return type.

Maybe you want to do something like this:

public <T extends String> T test()
{
    return obj;// obj could be a String
}

However, generic types are erased at runtime, and the method above would become

public Object test()
{
    return obj;// obj could be a String
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, but why did the first one compile? –  BalusC Nov 22 '10 at 19:58
    
The methods in both classes return real types. Generics, while declared, are not used at all. the only difference between classes that in a second one methods have not only the same name and arguments, but also same return types - and that what makes compiler to throw an error. If you remove Generics, they both will not compile, but first one actually compiles fine. –  Yuriy Nov 22 '10 at 19:59
    
The first class does not compile: Duplicate method test() in type SameSignatureMethods. Maybe you did not copy correctly the code. As I already said in my answer: a generic type definition does not mean that it is a return type. You can use it later in the contents of the method, or in the parameters, but the return type is still Boolean in your case. –  True Soft Nov 22 '10 at 20:06
    
Well, see, I understand why first one is fine. Looking at java spec basically says that overloaded method with same name must have diferent erausers. –  Yuriy Nov 22 '10 at 20:06
2  
@BalusC - first one compiling is a bug. see: bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6182950 - it no longer compiles in JDK7 –  Joshua McKinnon Nov 22 '10 at 22:25

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