Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I haven't found a way using .NET's XmlWriter and associated XmlWriterSettings to format an XML string in indented form exactly the way that Visual Studio does it with its auto-format command (Ctrl-E Ctrl-D, or, depending on keyboard mapping, Ctrl-K Ctrl-D).

I would like to do this because I habitually auto-format all my files in VS, both code and .config files. I have an installer app that updates .config files, and I would like to see actual diffs instead of the entire document changed.

I haven't explored all the different formatting options for auto-format, but I like each XML attribute to be on a separate line, with the first on the same line as the opening tag and subsequent ones lined up with the first, like this:

<asset assetId="12345"
       bucket="default"
       owner="nobody">
  <file path="\\localhost\share\assetA.mov"/>
  <metadata metadataId="23456"
            key="asset_type"
            value="video"/>
</asset>

I've tried formatting with XmlWriterSettings properties 'NewLineHandling = NewLineHandling.None' and 'NewLineOnAttributes = true', but that puts the first attribute below the opening tag and all attributes have the same indentation regardless of the # of characters in the element name, like this:

<asset
  assetId="12345"
  bucket="default"
  owner="nobody">
  <file
    path="\\localhost\share\assetA.mov" />
  <metadata metadataId="23456"
    key="asset_type"
    value="video" />
</asset>

Notice that the standard XmlWriter also ends attribute-only elements with " />" (extra space before the slash), which I dislike but not sure if that's the XML standard. I would think that Visual Studio uses the same API options readily available to developers, but I've yet to find those magical settings. Anyway, here's my format method:

public static string FormatXml( string xmlString, bool indented )
{
    using ( TextReader textReader = new StringReader( xmlString ) )
    using ( XmlReader xmlReader = new XmlTextReader( textReader ) )
    {
        using ( TextWriter textWriter = new StringWriter() )
        {
            var settings = new XmlWriterSettings();
            if ( indented )
            {
               settings.Indent = true;
               settings.IndentChars = "  ";
               settings.NewLineOnAttributes = true;
               settings.NewLineHandling = NewLineHandling.None;
            }
            using ( var xmlWriter = XmlWriter.Create( textWriter, settings ) )
            {
                while ( xmlReader.Read() )
                    xmlWriter.WriteNode( xmlReader, false );
            }
            return textWriter.ToString();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
It's not there. –  Hans Passant Nov 22 '10 at 20:44

3 Answers 3

I had misunderstood the question. Actually I don't know if there is a way to align the attributes in the way you shown. You could try to implement it yourself, something like this:

    public static string FormatXml(string xmlString, bool indented)
    {
        using (TextReader textReader = new StringReader(xmlString))
        using (XmlReader xmlReader = new XmlTextReader(textReader))
        {
            using (TextWriter textWriter = new StringWriter())
            {
                string indent = "";
                string attributeIndent = "";

                while (xmlReader.Read())
                {
                    if (xmlReader.NodeType == XmlNodeType.Element)
                    {
                        attributeIndent = "";
                        string element = xmlReader.Name;
                        textWriter.Write("{0}<{1}", indent, element);

                        if (!xmlReader.HasAttributes)
                            textWriter.WriteLine(">");
                        else
                        {
                            int actual = 1;
                            while (xmlReader.MoveToNextAttribute())
                            {
                                string content = String.Format("{0} {1}={2}", attributeIndent, xmlReader.Name, xmlReader.Value);
                                if (actual != xmlReader.AttributeCount)
                                    textWriter.WriteLine(content);
                                else
                                    textWriter.Write(content);

                                if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(attributeIndent))
                                    attributeIndent = indent + Enumerable.Repeat<string>(" ", element.Length + 1).Aggregate((a, b) => a + b);

                                actual++;
                            }
                            xmlReader.MoveToElement();
                            textWriter.WriteLine(">");
                            attributeIndent = "";
                        }
                        if (!xmlReader.IsEmptyElement)
                        {
                            indent += "  ";
                            textWriter.WriteLine(">");
                        }
                        else
                            textWriter.WriteLine("/>");
                    }
                    else if (xmlReader.NodeType == XmlNodeType.EndElement)
                    {
                        indent = indent.Substring(0, indent.Length - 2);
                        textWriter.WriteLine("{0}</{1}>", indent, xmlReader.Name);
                    }
                    else if (xmlReader.NodeType == XmlNodeType.Text)
                    {
                        textWriter.WriteLine(xmlReader.Value);
                    }
                }

                return textWriter.ToString();
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the example. I haven't tried it out yet, but I knew I could always output the elements manually and have to deal with the different node types, but I was hoping Microsoft wouldn't hide their Visual Studio implementation. –  Erhhung Nov 25 '10 at 1:05
    
Well, actually I don't know if there is something; googling I've found nothing. I hope what I posted can help you. –  as-cii Nov 25 '10 at 13:58

See the answer here: Is there a stylesheet or Windows commandline tool for controllable XML formatting, specifically putting attributes one-per-line?

It's close, but the primary difference at a glance is that the first attribute is on a new line, whereas in Visual Studio it stays on the same line as the element name.

share|improve this answer

I think quotes are invalid xml, which may give the reader/writer some heartburn. Other than that, why don't you just tell your diff application to ignore whitespace?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.