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In Python, it is quite simple to produce all permutations of a list using the itertools module. I have a situation where the list I'm using only has two characters (i.e. '1122'). I want to generate all unique permutations.

For the string '1122', there are 6 unique permutations (1122, 1212, 1221, etc), but itertools.permutations will yield 24 items. It's simple to only record the unique permutations, but it will take much longer than necessary to collect them as all 720 items are considered.

Is there a function or module that accounts for repeated elements when generating permutations so I don't have to write my own?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

This web page looks promising.

def next_permutation(seq, pred=cmp):
    """Like C++ std::next_permutation() but implemented as
    generator. Yields copies of seq."""
    def reverse(seq, start, end):
        # seq = seq[:start] + reversed(seq[start:end]) + \
        #       seq[end:]
        end -= 1
        if end <= start:
            return
        while True:
            seq[start], seq[end] = seq[end], seq[start]
            if start == end or start+1 == end:
                return
            start += 1
            end -= 1
    if not seq:
        raise StopIteration
    try:
        seq[0]
    except TypeError:
        raise TypeError("seq must allow random access.")
    first = 0
    last = len(seq)
    seq = seq[:]
    # Yield input sequence as the STL version is often
    # used inside do {} while.
    yield seq
    if last == 1:
        raise StopIteration
    while True:
        next = last - 1
        while True:
            # Step 1.
            next1 = next
            next -= 1
            if pred(seq[next], seq[next1]) < 0:
                # Step 2.
                mid = last - 1
                while not (pred(seq[next], seq[mid]) < 0):
                    mid -= 1
                seq[next], seq[mid] = seq[mid], seq[next]
                # Step 3.
                reverse(seq, next1, last)
                # Change to yield references to get rid of
                # (at worst) |seq|! copy operations.
                yield seq[:]
                break
            if next == first:
                raise StopIteration
    raise StopIteration

>>> for p in next_permutation([int(c) for c in "111222"]):
...     print p
... 
[1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2]
[1, 1, 2, 1, 2, 2]
[1, 1, 2, 2, 1, 2]
[1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 1]
[1, 2, 1, 1, 2, 2]
[1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2]
[1, 2, 1, 2, 2, 1]
[1, 2, 2, 1, 1, 2]
[1, 2, 2, 1, 2, 1]
[1, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1]
[2, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2]
[2, 1, 1, 2, 1, 2]
[2, 1, 1, 2, 2, 1]
[2, 1, 2, 1, 1, 2]
[2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1]
[2, 1, 2, 2, 1, 1]
[2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 2]
[2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1]
[2, 2, 1, 2, 1, 1]
[2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1]
>>> 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This indeed looks like exactly what I need. –  JoshD Nov 22 '10 at 21:00
    
Is it OK that reverse is used on each iteration? It has O(n) complexity, and the fact it's run on every iteration may make the whole algorithm pretty slow. –  ovgolovin Dec 24 '11 at 16:48
    
I modified the code a bit for it to be more to the point and reflect the names used to describe the algorithm in the Knuth's book. For those who need it I post the link: ideone.com/juG94 –  ovgolovin Dec 24 '11 at 18:02
    
Also, I have rewritten this algorithm using more functional style coding (with generators). It's a few times slower than the version working directly with indexes. Still, the main part of the algorithm (beginning with while True:) looks more clear in this version. The code is here: ideone.com/mvu1y –  ovgolovin Dec 24 '11 at 18:04
    
Nice work, but I can not realize why it does not work with zeros in the sequence –  freude Jun 3 '13 at 12:17

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