Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following classes

  class GridBase
  {
    public object DataSource { get; set; }
  }

  class GenericGrid<T> : GridBase
  {
    public new T DataSource { get; set; }
  }

Both GridBase and Generic Grid classes can be instantiated and one can descend from either as well.

Is this considered the correct/accepted way to implement such a hierarchy? Or should you go the extra mile and implement it like the following

  class GridBase
  {
    protected object dataSource;
    public object DataSource { get { return dataSource; } set { dataSource = value; } }
  }

  class GenericGrid<T> : GridBase
  {
    public new T DataSource { get { return (T)dataSource; } set { dataSource = value; } }
  }

The same applies to non generic classes when a property is re-introduced in a descendant, I'm just using a generic example here.

Another case and question

  abstract class SomeBase
  {
    protected abstract void DoSomething();
  }

  class Child : SomeBase
  {
    protected override void DoSomething()
    {
      /* Some implementation here */
    }
  }

The situation here is that framework "X" declares SomeBase allowing you to define your own descendants. The classes they create (at run time) then descend from your class (Child in the this case). However, they don't call your DoSomething() method, from their implementation of DoSomething().

On their part, they can't blindly call base.Dosomething() either because the typical case is that the class they generate normally descends from SomeBase and since the method is abstract that's not valid. (Personally, I don't like this behavior in C#).

But anyway, is that good or accepted design, that is not calling base.xxx(), especially when the the "intent" seems to contradict?

EDIT From a framework design perspective. Is it ok/acceptable that it does this? If not how would it be designed so as to either prevent such a case or better impart their intent (in both cases).

share|improve this question
2  
Your second question should be a separate question. –  Jason Nov 22 '10 at 21:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The second form of the generic inheritance (casting the base class' attribute) is more correct as it does not violate Liskov Substitution Principle. It is conceivable that an instance of the generic class is cast into base class and accessing Data through the base class points to a different property. You will need to keep both in sync in order for the derived class to be substitutable for the base class.

Alternatively, you can implement some sort of a strategy pattern where the base class asks for the Data property from the derived class, in order to avoid awkward downcasting. This is what I had in mind:

public class Base {
  private readonly object m_Data; //immutable data, as per JaredPar suggestion that base class shouldn't be able to change it

  publlic Base(object data) {
    m_Data = data;
  }


  protected virtual object GetData() {return m_Data;}

  public Object DataSource {get {return GetData();}} 
}

public class Derived<T> : Base {
  private T m_Data;

  public Derived():base(null){}
  protected override object GetData() {return m_Data;}

  protected new T Data {return m_Data;}
}

With regards to the second question, I am note sure I understand the question. Sound like the problem you are having is to with the framework not calling the abstract method when it generates a proxy at runtime, which is always legal in abstract classes, as the only way for that code to execute is through a derived class which must override the abstract method.

share|improve this answer
    
As regards the second case, you seem to understand it correctly. However, when the proxy is created it descends from Child and Child has an implementation of DoSomething(). So in such a situation I would expect the generated class to call base.DoSomething() at some point it it's own implementation of DoSomething(). And if that's not the case then how would you impart that via design? –  Shiv Kumar Nov 22 '10 at 21:21
    
I don't think you can design around the framework not calling the base class. Depending on what it is(e.g. Entity Framework) you might need to modify the templates generating the proxy classes. –  Igor Zevaka Nov 22 '10 at 21:28
    
the question is more about how the framework should be designed. Or how the framework could convey that better or prevent such situations using a better design (if their implementation is considered "that's fine"). –  Shiv Kumar Nov 22 '10 at 21:32
    
@Shiv, I would argue that you should always assume the worst case that the deriving class will choose not to call your base implementation. If there is code you must execute in order to preserve your class invariants, it shouldn't be in a virtual method. The 'base' functionality is convenient for inheritors, as it provides an easy way to tack on 'before' and 'after' logic, but they always have the option of completely replacing the code with a different implementation. –  Dan Bryant Nov 22 '10 at 21:48
    
I'm marking Igor's responses as the answer. @Dan, yea that's the part that I wish there was a better way to specify intent through design. –  Shiv Kumar Nov 23 '10 at 12:31

For the DataSource question I prefer the following pattern

abstract class GridBase {
  public abstract object DataSource { get; }
}

class GenericGrid<T> : GridBase { 
  private T m_data;

  public override object DataSource { 
    get { return m_data; }
  }
  public T DataSourceTyped { 
    get { return m_data; }
    set { m_data = value; }
  }
}

Reasons

  • Having the GridBase.DataSource member be writable is type unsafe. It allows me to break the contract of GenericGrid<T> by setting the value to a non-T instance
  • This is more of a matter of opinion but I dislike the use of new because it often confuses users. I prefer the suffix ~Type" for this scenario
  • This only requires the data be stored once
  • Doesn't require any unsafe casting.

EDIT OP corrected that GridBase and GenericGrid are both usable types

In that case I would say you need to reconsider your design a bit. Having them both as usable types opens you up to very easy to expose type errors.

GenericGrid<int> grid = new GenericGrid<int>();
GridBase baseGrid = grid;
baseGrid.DataSource = "bad";
Console.Write(grid.DataSource); // Error!!!

The design will be a lot more reliable if separate the storage from the access of the values in a manner like my original sample. You could extend it further with the following code to have a usable non-generic container

class Grid : GridBase { 
  private objecm m_data;
  public override object DataSource {
    get { return m_data; }
  }
  public object DataSourceTyped {
    get { return m_data; }
    set { m_data = value; }
  }

}
share|improve this answer
    
I should have mentioned that both GridBase and GenericGrid are usable classes, that is you can instantiate both. I'll modify my question –  Shiv Kumar Nov 22 '10 at 21:09
    
I'd go one step further and suggest that GridBase be generic, as well. This would avoid both the new keyword, and the need for a second ~Typed property. –  James King Nov 22 '10 at 21:20
    
@James B that would prevent the storage of the abstract concept of GridBase. For example, imagine I wanted to store a bunch of GridBase values and print them out later. With GridBase being generic there is no way to do this for every possible GridBase<T> instance. –  JaredPar Nov 22 '10 at 21:22

I would prefer something like this:

interface IGrid {
    object DataSource { get; }
}

interface IGrid<T> {
    T DataSource { get; }
}

public Grid : IGrid {
    public object DataSource { get; private set; }

    // details elided
}

public Grid<T> : IGrid<T> {
    public T DataSource { get; private set; }
    object IGrid.DataSource { get { return this.DataSource; } }

    // details elided
}

Note that I am NOT inheriting from Grid.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.