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I am using this example: http://doc.qt.nokia.com/4.7/modelview.html.

I'm trying to iterate through a map to create a QTreeView. For instance:

QMap < QString, QString > map;
map.insert("Menu1", "parent");
map.insert("1", "child");
map.insert("2", "child");
map.insert("Menu2", "parent");
map.insert("3", "child");

From here, I want to iterate through it, programatically creating QStandardItem objects.

Code is below:

 #include <QTreeView>
 #include <QStandardItemModel>
 #include <QItemSelectionModel>
 #include "mainwindow.h"

 MainWindow::MainWindow(QWidget *parent)
     : QMainWindow(parent)
 {
     treeView = new QTreeView(this);
     setCentralWidget(treeView);
     standardModel = new QStandardItemModel ;
     QStandardItem *rootNode = standardModel->invisibleRootItem();

     QMap < QString, QString >::iterator i;
     for (i = map.begin(); i != map.end(); ++i) {

         if (i.value() == "parent") {

              QStandardItem* /* set name programatically */ = new QStandardItem(i.key());
              rootNode->appendRow(/* name that was just set */);
              //normal example
              //QStandardItem *someItem = new QStandardItem(i.key());
              //rootNode->appendRow(someItem);

         } else {

              //we have a child
              QStandardItem *childItem =  new QStandardItem(i.key());
              //add to last parent
              /*programatically set parent item name */->appendRow(childItem);

         }

     }

     //register the model
     treeView->setModel(standardModel);
     treeView->expandAll();

     //selection changes shall trigger a slot
     QItemSelectionModel *selectionModel= treeView->selectionModel();
     connect(selectionModel, SIGNAL(selectionChanged (const QItemSelection &, const QItemSelection &)),
             this, SLOT(selectionChangedSlot(const QItemSelection &, const QItemSelection &)));
 }
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What is your question? –  Jakub Wieczorek Nov 22 '10 at 21:24
    
how do i programitically create a QStandardItem name? QStandardItem* name; Where "name" is based on a QString (i.key()) in this case. –  Frank LoVecchio Nov 22 '10 at 21:29
    
Am I correct in believing that you're really asking "does C++ let me have variables whose names are determined at runtime?" –  gspr Nov 22 '10 at 21:36
    
I'm not actually seeing what on earth you're trying to do here. Even if you could set the variable name at runtime, you don't run any code that makes any use of the variable name. What exactly is this supposed to achieve? –  Puppy Nov 22 '10 at 22:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This thing almost certainly doesn't begin to do what you want. Even if you could do what you want, even if you used Kash's method of getting the same behavior as if you could do what you want, you will not get what you want from the code. I'm assuming that you expect:

QMap < QString, QString > map;
map.insert("Menu1", "parent");
map.insert("1", "child");
map.insert("2", "child");
map.insert("Menu2", "parent");
map.insert("3", "child");

To result in:

Menu1
  1
  2
Menu2
  3

It won't. The first thing that's likely to get hit when you iterate that map is ("1","child")--this isn't guaranteed but is likely. There IS no last parent in this case. Furthermore, the next ones you'll hit are 2 and 3, leaving your "parent" items for last.

When you iterate a map (and yes, QMap works the same way) you iterate "in-order" of key, not the order you placed them in. You actually can't get the order you added them back out of a map.

Sorry, you need to rethink your algorithm. I'm fairly certain that this is not what you wanted.

BTW, to actually give you an answer that directly answers your question and ignores the fact that what you're attempting is wrong:

 std::map<QString, QStandardItem*> item_map;
 QMap < QString, QString >::iterator i;
 for (i = map.begin(); i != map.end(); ++i) {

     if (i.value() == "parent") {

          item_map[i.key()] = new QStandardItem(i.key());
          rootNode->appendRow(/* name that was just set */);
          //normal example
          //QStandardItem *someItem = new QStandardItem(i.key());
          //rootNode->appendRow(someItem);

     } else {

          //we have a child
          QStandardItem *childItem =  new QStandardItem(i.key());
          //add to last parent
          item_map[i.key()]->appendRow(childItem);

     }
}

This of course still does not work. You need a string that refers back to the parent somehow and you've not provided it. You might get by with using the value for sub-items and the key for parent. If value == parent then it's a parent and base on key. If otherwise then key holds parent value and value holds child value. Still not very expressive, but it's better than what you've got.

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It's impossible using C++. And what's a point to do that? If you need "named" pointer, you can use QMap< QString, QStandardItem *> itemsMap, It will looks like

itemsMap[ i.key() ] = new QStandardItem( i.key() );

But if you need only last parent (as example says), you can declare QStandardItem *parent = NULL; before loop and use It inside.

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