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I need to use the advantages of delphi sets like "in" in c++, but I don't know if there is a data structure like sets in c++

I know that I may use an array instead, but as I have said I want to use sets advantages like "in", so is there any built in data structure like sets in c++?

If yes, please explain how to use it, I'm still a starter in c++

If no, is there any way to represent it (exept array since I know it).

thanks in advance :)

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4  
std::set is a set. You can #include <set> to get it. –  birryree Nov 22 '10 at 21:50
1  
"set of" and its native operators (in, +, -, *) are peculiar to Pascal (and Delphi). C++ implements something alike using templates, but they lack the elegance of the Pascal implementation (although right now Pascal sets are limited to 255 elements) –  user160694 Nov 22 '10 at 22:31
2  
@ldsandon: 256 elements - 0..255. :-) –  Uli Gerhardt Nov 22 '10 at 22:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

There is a standard library container called std::set... I don't know delphi, but a simple element in set operation would be implemented by using the find method and comparing the result with end:

std::set<int> s;
s.insert( 5 );
if ( s.find( 5 ) != s.end() ) {
   // 5 is in the set
}

Other operations might be implemented as algorithms in the standard library (std::union, std::difference... )

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Use std::set. See http://www.cplusplus.com for reference.

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In C++ there is nothing similarly integrated. Depending on your needs you might want to use bit flags and bitwise operations or the std::bitset standard container (besides std::set, of course). If you are using C++Builder there is also a class that simulates Delphi sets - search System.hpp for something like BaseSet or SetBase or similar - I don't recall the exact name.

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Yes, there is a C++ STL set container class described on p. 491 of Stroustrup's TC++PL (Special Ed.).

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STL algorithm has the following From MSDN

set_difference Unites all of the elements that belong to one sorted source range, but not to a second sorted source range, into a single, sorted destination range, where the ordering criterion may be specified by a binary predicate.

set_intersection Unites all of the elements that belong to both sorted source ranges into a single, sorted destination range, where the ordering criterion may be specified by a binary predicate.

set_symmetric_difference Unites all of the elements that belong to one, but not both, of the sorted source ranges into a single, sorted destination range, where the ordering criterion may be specified by a binary predicate.

set_union Unites all of the elements that belong to at least one of two sorted source ranges into a single, sorted destination range, where the ordering criterion may be specified by a binary predicate.

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These are algorithms that operate on ordered containers (on pairs of iterators to ordered elements to be precise), not the container itself. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 23 '10 at 9:03

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