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I want to prevent users submitting forms multiple times in .NET MVC. I've tried several methods using Javascript but have had difficulties getting it to work in all browsers. So, how can I prevent this in my controller? It there some way that multiple submissions can be detected?

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possible duplicate of Troubleshooting anti-forgery token problems – Bohdan Lyzanets Jun 19 '14 at 12:07
    
Most of the answers below speak to using the form id. See this to set the form id: stackoverflow.com/q/2854616/3885927 – user3885927 May 31 at 19:20
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Dont reinvent the wheel :)

Use the Post/Redirect/Get design pattern.

Here you can find a question and an answer giving some suggestions on how to implement it in ASP.NET MVC.

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21  
the PRG pattern is indeed very good and I would also recommend it but I don't see how it could solve the issue. Let's take for example a slow POST action which processes a payment. The user clicks on the submit button and it might take some time before his request is processed and he is redirected to the success page. He might wonder what's going on and whether he clicked on the submit button. So he clicks it a second time which leads to a second HTTP request being sent to the server with the same data and without knowing it he orders the product twice. – Darin Dimitrov Nov 23 '10 at 7:04
2  
According to the linked Wikipedia article the PRG pattern can't prevent duplicate form submission "if a web user clicks a submission button multiple times before the server response loads" – Phil Hale Nov 23 '10 at 9:10
    
@Darin: you're right but that problem could be easily solved by disabling the button after the click which, in any case, is only going to protect you in that specific moment. Please read more in my next comment @Phil Hale – Lorenzo Nov 23 '10 at 10:35
1  
@Phil Hale: yes. and then it continues saying (may be prevented by using JavaScript to disable the button after the first click). You can't simply protect yourself from all the cases that can cause a double submission using only one method. The PRG pattern does give you an experienced way to protect from most of the pitfalls. Adding a javascript is only going to protect you in that specific moment – Lorenzo Nov 23 '10 at 10:36
1  
Not sure why it is marked as an answer if it needs to use javascript – Alberto Montellano Jul 14 '14 at 22:10

I've tried several methods using Javascript but have had difficulties getting it to work in all browsers

Have you tried using jquery?

$('#myform').submit(function() {
    $(this).find(':submit').attr('disabled', 'disabled');
});

This should take care of the browser differences.

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Yeah I've tried that particular solution and it doesn't work in some versions of IE, which is why I'm trying to find a non Javascript solution – Phil Hale Nov 22 '10 at 22:18
    
Do you mind sharing in which versions of IE? – Darin Dimitrov Nov 22 '10 at 22:19
3  
you could mark as answer, so I would have read this before the other one ;) – VinnyG Mar 23 '11 at 20:10
1  
While it's preventing a second click, it's also eating the click event so my form submit no longer works :( – SteveCav Jul 24 '13 at 4:01
3  
I found it necessary to check if $("form").valid() otherwise it would be stuck on disable when there was validation errors – John Nov 26 '13 at 7:26

Just to complete the answer of @Darin, if you want to handle the client validation (if the form has required fields), you can check if there's input validation error before disabling the submit button :

$('#myform').submit(function () {
    if ($(this).find('.input-validation-error').length == 0) {
        $(this).find(':submit').attr('disabled', 'disabled');
    }
});
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3  
Thanks, FYI: this solution also worked with unobtrusive validation (including server side). I tried to rapid-click the upvote button to give you more points, but StackOverflow blocked multiple submits... :-) – Robert Corvus Feb 6 '12 at 17:33
    
what if we use $(this).valid()<br/> $('form').submit(function () { ('.input-validation-error').length); if ($(this).valid()) { $(this).find(':submit').attr('disabled', 'disabled'); } }); – aamir sajjad Jul 28 '14 at 16:56

Way late to this party :)

First, make sure you're using the AntiForgeryToken on your form.

Then you can make a custom ActionFilter:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Method, AllowMultiple = false, Inherited = true)]
public class PreventDuplicateRequestAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute {
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext) {
        if (HttpContext.Current.Request["__RequestVerificationToken"] == null)
            return;

        var currentToken = HttpContext.Current.Request["__RequestVerificationToken"].ToString();

        if (HttpContext.Current.Session["LastProcessedToken"] == null) {
            HttpContext.Current.Session["LastProcessedToken"] = currentToken;
            return;
        }

        lock (HttpContext.Current.Session["LastProcessedToken"]) {
            var lastToken = HttpContext.Current.Session["LastProcessedToken"].ToString();

            if (lastToken == currentToken) {
                filterContext.Controller.ViewData.ModelState.AddModelError("", "Looks like you accidentally tried to double post.");
                return;
            }

            HttpContext.Current.Session["LastProcessedToken"] = currentToken;
        }
    }
}

And on your controller action you just...

[HttpPost]
[ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
[PreventDuplicateRequest]
public ActionResult CreatePost(InputModel input) {
   ...
}

You'll notice this doesn't prevent the request altogether. Instead it returns an error in the modelstate, so when your action checks if ModelState.IsValid then it will see that it is not, and will return with your normal error handling.

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This is the best answer to this question in my opinion. When, for whatever reason, client-side prevention of double-submission won't work, this provides a neat way of catching it on the server-side. Kudos for the use of an action attribute and repurposing the anti-forgery helper to provide a one-time token, it makes it really easy to apply this. – ngm May 9 at 9:11
    
Great answer, thanks Jim, it's good to mention this will not work when using LB, unless if share session has been implemented. – InkHeart Jun 29 at 2:13

You could include a hidden (random or counter) value in the form post, a controller could track these values in an 'open' list or something similar; every time your controller hands out a form it embeds a value, which it tracks allowing one post use of it.

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what if we use $(this).valid()

 $('form').submit(function () {
            if ($(this).valid()) {
                $(this).find(':submit').attr('disabled', 'disabled');
            }
        });
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I found this is the right way. Using "($(this).find('.input-validation-error').length == 0)" from another answer doesn't work for me. That option disables the submit button even when there are validation errors. It could be because "($(this).find('.input-validation-error').length == 0)" is being called before the validation occurs. – user3885927 May 31 at 19:16

In its self, no, however depending on what the controller is actually doing, you should be able to work out a way.

Is a record being created in the database that you can check for to see if they've already submitted the form?

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I think that would be possible, but I was hoping to find a different method – Phil Hale Nov 22 '10 at 22:27

You can also pass some sort of token in a hidden field and validate this in the controller.

Or you work with redirects after submitting values. But this get's difficult if you take heavily advantage of ajax.

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This works on every browser

 document.onkeydown = function () {
        switch (event.keyCode) {
            case 116: //F5 button
                event.returnValue = false;
                event.keyCode = 0;
                return false;
            case 82: //R button
                if (event.ctrlKey) {
                    event.returnValue = false;
                    event.keyCode = 0;
                    return false;
                }
        }
    }
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This uses javascript. The OP is looking for a no javascript solution. – Ben Bartle Oct 29 '14 at 6:31

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