Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say you have the string "This is a test"

I pass it to method zee, like ("This is a test", 1) and want "test This is a";

I pass it to method zee, like ("This is a test", 2) and want "a test This is";

the number can exceed the total words in variable. If it does it should loop around.

I started with....

public static string zee(string origString, int i)
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    ArrayList list = new ArrayList();
    list.AddRange(origString.Split(' '));

    // not sure here - 
    for (int c = i; c < (list.Count + i); c++)
    {
        sb.AppendFormat("{0} ", list[c]);
    }

    return sb.ToString();
}
share|improve this question
5  
Perhaps this is something you should take some time to work out on your own. It's not a complicated question and would probably be a good learning experience to experiment with different ways to solve. –  Chris Lively Nov 22 '10 at 22:40
6  
Any reason you're using ArrayList rather than List<T>? It's 2010 :) –  Jon Skeet Nov 22 '10 at 22:42
    
@Jon, in fact it's the end of 2010. This makes things even worse with C# 5.0 knocking at the door :-) –  Darin Dimitrov Nov 22 '10 at 22:50
    
@Chris Lively: Interesting angle on a Q&A forum. "not complicated" is relative to experience level. Would you like somebody to tell you to figure out your next ASP.NET question on your own, or are you asking because you need help with it? For example, I think you could have figured this one out on your own: stackoverflow.com/questions/587678 In fact you kind of did. –  John K Nov 22 '10 at 23:01
    
@John K: You'll notice on my question I gave a potential answer and was just looking for a better way, then I waited 19 months to answer it myself and close the question. However, here we have someone that based on their previous Q&A on this site should be able to solve this particular problem within a few minutes. Given the recent rash of interview questions and the sheer number of emails I've received lately asking if I'm looking for a job based off of finding me on this site I have to question the intent here. –  Chris Lively Nov 22 '10 at 23:12

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted
for(int j=0; j < list.length; j++){
    int idx = (j + i) % list.length;
    sb.AppendFormat("{0} " , list[idx]);
}

Mostly like Brent Arias's solution, but I think a for loop is more readable, less likely to go infinite.

    public static string zee(string origString, int i)
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

        List<string> list = new List<string>();
        list.AddRange(origString.Split(' '));

        for (int j = 0; j < list.Count; j++)
        {
            int idx = (j + i) % list.Count;
            sb.AppendFormat("{0} ", list[idx]);
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
ha, ironic! this will loop infinitely. might want to add a j++ to the loop ;) –  jb. Nov 22 '10 at 23:06
    
Where are the spaces? –  OJ. Nov 22 '10 at 23:10
    
@jb, technically it wouldn't compile.. –  Blindy Nov 22 '10 at 23:10
    
@Blindy true, you are quite right. –  jb. Nov 22 '10 at 23:12
    
If Mike will add the j++, I will 'up' this answer. I think it is the cleanest of them all. –  Brent Arias Nov 22 '10 at 23:56

This is how I'd solve it.

    private static string f(string s, int start)
    {
        var arr=s.Split(' ');
        start %= arr.Length;

        var res=arr.Skip(arr.Length - start).ToList();
        res.AddRange(arr.Take(arr.Length - start));
        return string.Join(" ", res);
    }

I tried writing a one liner with linq but I don't see how to combine 2 lists. Union and Join aren't what I need.

share|improve this answer
2  
.Concat will combine two sequences. –  Anthony Pegram Nov 23 '10 at 0:32

Sounds like a homework question to me, but here is an efficient use of the .Net framework:

    private static string [] SplitWords(string s, int startWord)
    {
        string[] words = s.Split(' ');
        List<string> output = new List<string>();
        output.AddRange(words.Skip(startWord).ToArray());
        output.AddRange(words.Take(startWord).ToArray());
        return output.ToArray();
    }

There is absolutely no error checking in this function so you will have to modify it for production code but you get the idea.

share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't generate a sentence with spaces like the question asked. –  OJ. Nov 22 '10 at 23:10
1  
Hardly efficient, you're creating 3 arrays in addition to the resulting string (assuming you read the requirements again and fix it). It's maintainable though! –  Blindy Nov 22 '10 at 23:11
    
@OJ I'm sure you can figure out how to make a sentence with spaces. That's pretty trivial. The point is the words are now ordered the way you want it. @Blindy Maintainable is my goal. I write production code in a large team environment. The last think I want is someone asking me about some code I wrote 8 months ago. Thanks for the compliment! :) –  SRM Nov 22 '10 at 23:22

This is how I'd solve it using strings.

    public static string zee(string origString, int i)
    {
        string[] splitStr = origString.Split(' ');
        string newStr = "";

        // Not sure what you meant by wrap around but this should
        // do the trick.
        i %= splitStr.Length;

        for (int j = (splitStr.Length - i); j < splitStr.Length; j++)
            newStr += splitStr[j] + " "; // Add spaces taken by split :(

        for (int j = 0; j < (splitStr.Length - i); j++)
            newStr += splitStr[j] + " ";

        return
            newStr;
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
Oh my holy god. :) –  OJ. Nov 22 '10 at 23:10
    
Ha, is that a good or a bad statement?! :) –  Simon Campbell Nov 22 '10 at 23:16

Here's an abomination trying to cram as much into one line as possible:

static string zee(string sentence, int wordCount)
{
  var words = sentence.Split(' ');
  return string.Join(" ", new[] { words.Skip(words.Count() - wordCount), words.Take(words.Count() - wordCount) }.SelectMany(w => w).ToArray());
}
share|improve this answer
1  
duh, SelectMany, I kept trying to remember how to combine 2 enumerables in place -.- –  Blindy Nov 22 '10 at 23:13
    
Yeah, unfortunately there isn't a flatten method. So I tend to use the SelectMany(id) approach :) –  OJ. Nov 22 '10 at 23:15

I havn't tried it, but I think this would do it:

i %= list.Length;
int index = i;
do {
  index %= list.Length;
  sb.AppendFormat("{0} ", list[index]);
while (++index != i);
share|improve this answer
static string rearrange(string phase,int index)
{
    string[] words = phase.Split(' ');
    string[] newwords = new string[words.Length];

    int pointer = index;
    for (int i = 0; i < words.Length;i++ )
    {
        if(pointer>=words.Length)
        {
            pointer = 0;
        }
        newwords[i] = words[pointer];
        pointer++;
    }

    return string.Join(" ", newwords);
}
share|improve this answer
public string SetStart(int startAt)
{
    const string sentence = "this is a test so it is";

    var words = sentence.Split(' ');

    var x = (startAt > words.Count()) ? startAt%words.Count() : startAt;

    return string.Join(" ", words.Skip(x).Concat(words.Take(x)));            
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, so I got the modulus round the wrong way but it's fixed now :) –  Kam Nov 22 '10 at 23:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.