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I'm working in Objective-C on the iPhone and need to know whether a 'Class' inherits from 'NSObject'.

I tried checking if it responds to an NSObject selector:

bool success = [myClass respondsToSelector:@selector(class)];

but you can guess what happened... it didn't even respond to "respondsToSelector:" so it throws a "does not implement doesNotRecognizeSelector:" exception.

I tried to catch that exception, but it looks like it can't be caught with a @try-@catch.

Any ideas?

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2  
I think the better question is how you've come to be dealing with these classes that don't inherit from NSObject. There shouldn't be any except Protocol. –  Chuck Nov 22 '10 at 23:33
1  
@Chuck and NSProxy. –  Dave DeLong Nov 23 '10 at 0:52
    
You mean @selector(class). I don't think there's anything in the SDK that responds to +class:. –  tc. Nov 23 '10 at 3:00
    
I'm creating a library to make serialization easier, which means I'm dealing with classes that I didn't create. I need to verify, at the very least, that a class conforms to the NSObject protocol before I can work with it - otherwise an "uncatchable exception" is thrown (as Tommy mentioned below). –  bendytree Nov 23 '10 at 14:18
    
@Dave DeLong: I was kind of handwaving that, because an NSProxy to an NSObject acts like an NSObject. It doesn't create the problem where you need to know what kind of object you have in order to know what messages you need to send to ask what kind of object it is. –  Chuck Nov 23 '10 at 17:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Go direct to the Objective-C runtime:

#import <objc/runtime.h>

/* originally posted version — works because eventually class_getSuperclass(class)
returns nil, and class_getSuperclass(nil) does so also. */
BOOL classDescendsFromClass(Class classA, Class classB)
{
    while(1)
    {
        if(classA == classB) return YES;
        id superClass = class_getSuperclass(classA);
        if(classA == superClass) return (superClass == classB);
        classA = superClass;
    }
}

/* shorter version; exits straight after classA turns into nil */
BOOL classDescendsFromClassShorter(Class classA, Class classB)
{
    while(classA)
    {
        if(classA == classB) return YES;
        classA = class_getSuperclass(classA);
    }

    return NO;
}
...

if(classDescendsFromClass(classToTest->isa, [NSObject class]) ...

class_getSuperclass does what it says, and it's safe to compare metaclasses by pointer in the Objective-C runtime because there is only exactly one instance of the metaclass for each class. The isa pointer is the only thing that's definitely in struct objc_object.

EDIT: additionally, there are known bugs in the iPhone simulator that cause some exceptions not to be caught by try/catch blocks. I've reported them as a bug to Apple and been told that mine was a duplicate, so they are definitely aware. Did you try your code on a real device or just in the simulator?

EDIT2: from the wider context given elsewhere in this conversation, something like this might be smarter:

#import <objc/runtime.h>

BOOL classRespondsToSelector(Class classA, SEL selector)
{
    return class_getInstanceMethod(classA, selector) ? YES : NO;
}

....
if(classRespondsToSelector(instance->isa, @selector(respondsToSelector:))
{
     // great, we've got something that responds to respondsToSelector:; do the
     // rest of our querying through there
}
share|improve this answer
    
This answer is excellent and works perfect. You're right about the try/catch blocks on the simulator/device too. I've read that try/catch blocks shouldn't be used to control flow (in obj-c), plus I'm not willing to lose simulator debugging, so I'll stick with this 'getSuperclass' concept. –  bendytree Nov 23 '10 at 14:31
    
It's not quite right actually; I allowed myself to become a tiny bit confused — NSObject's isa pointer points to NSObject (ie, even the NSObject metaclass is itself a subclass of NSObject), but NSObject is not a superclass of itself. So if(classA == superClass) terminates classDescendsFromClass one iteration later than necessary (because it eventually gets nil as a superclass of nil). I'll fix the code. –  Tommy Nov 23 '10 at 21:31
1  
If you prefer more Obj-C like syntax: gist.github.com/BillinghamJ/6709374 –  James Billingham Sep 26 '13 at 3:08
2  
You might want to use object_getClass(classA) instead of ->isa –  David Lawson Apr 30 '14 at 14:42

You can use the methods isKindOfClass: and isMemberOfClass: to determine whether a class is a subclass of another class or if it is a particular class.

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4  
These methods are part of the NSObject protocol. Objects that don't conform to the NSObject protocol may not respond to these messages. –  Greg Nov 23 '10 at 0:16
    
True, but as everyone else is saying, why would you be dealing with objects that don't conform to the NSObject protocol? That is a bigger, much more important question. There shouldn't be any reason for you not to have an object that doesn't conform to this protocol. –  Jasarien Nov 23 '10 at 11:49
1  
What if you're examining a Class object? –  James Billingham Sep 26 '13 at 2:57

respondsToSelector: is itself an NSObject-defined selector, so you can't use it. I don't believe there's a way to do this without getting very deep into the internals of Objective-C.

May I ask why you have objects that aren't descendants of NSObject? Apple very strongly recommends you don't attempt to create them, and with good reason.

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2  
Actually, NSProxy is a class Apple provides that doesn't inherit from NSObject. It does, however, conform to the NSObject protocol which is more important. –  cobbal Nov 22 '10 at 23:41
    
It is reasonably safe to assume that everything will respond to everything defined in NSObject. NSProxy doesn't, but is expected to forward to "real" objects that do. –  tc. Nov 23 '10 at 3:04

The class 'Class' does not inherit from NSObject. That means methods defined by NSObject (such as isKindOfClass or respondsToSelector) cannot be used on it.

What are you trying to do with it in the first place?

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-1 it does. A Class is an instance of the metaclass, e.g. -NSObject is an instance of +NSObject whose superclass is -NSObject, therefore -NSObject is an instance of -NSObject. I'm not sure what metaclasses are instances of (probably also NSObject!), or what happens if you use a different root class (i.e. if you don't inherit from NSObject), but metaclasses are the basis for class methods (as opposed to static methods, which don't have a "self"). –  tc. Nov 23 '10 at 3:14
1  
-1 there is no Class class –  user102008 Aug 8 '11 at 23:41

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