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I am wanting to construct an object from within a generic method. This object takes a string in its constructor. Something like this:

public T GetObject<T>()
{
    return new T("Hello");
}

Is this possible?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

One option is to rewrite this to force the caller to pass in a factory method / lambda

public T GetObject<T>(Func<string,T> func) 
{ 
  return func("Hello");
} 

The call site would be modified to look like this

GetObject(x => new T(x));
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The method signature gets a lot more complicated than dtb's solution, but I do like the compile-time checking that comes with it. Trade-offs, I guess. –  Smashery Nov 23 '10 at 0:22

Yes, but only without compile-time checking if the constructor really exists: Activator.CreateInstance

public T GetObject<T>()
{
    return (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), "Hello");
}
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So if the (string) constructor doesn't exist, it'll be a runtime error? –  Smashery Nov 23 '10 at 0:06
    
@Smashery: Exactly. It will throw an exception if T doesn't have a public (string) constructor. –  dtb Nov 23 '10 at 0:07
    
Thanks very much! Sucks I can only pick one "correct answer", but thanks for teaching me something new! –  Smashery Nov 23 '10 at 1:49

No. At the moment you cannot use parameterised constructors with generic types since you cannot define them in where.

Using Activator is not the same - and I believe not the answer to your question - but you can use it of course.

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