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I have an inheritance chain that consists of three classes A,B, and C, where A and B are abstract, and C is a concrete implementation of B.

I have a virtual method on the base abstract class A, Foo() that I would like to override in the concrete class C.

If I try and override just in Class C it is never picked up and always uses the default base class implementation, but if I override in both B & C, it only ever uses the B.Foo() implementation of the virtual method.

Do I have to declare something extra on B.Foo() other than 'override'?

Obviously these are simplified versions of my classes, but here are my method declarations:

abstract class A {
  protected virtual string Foo() {
    return "A";
  }
}

abstract class B : A {
  protected override string Foo() {
    return "B";
  }
}

class C : B {
  protected override string Foo() {
    return "C";
  }
}
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Have you tried testing the simplified version of your classes? –  Joe Albahari Nov 23 '10 at 1:10
1  
How are you calling Foo() on class C? I tried reproducing using your sample and was unable. –  Jason Nov 23 '10 at 1:13
    
I had this same problem problem to due to other errors. Once those were fixed and I rebuilt the error went away. –  Danielson Dec 3 at 20:32

2 Answers 2

Huh?

void Main()
{
    new C().DumpFoo(); // C
    A x=new C();
    x.BaseDumpFoo(); //C
}

abstract class A {
  protected virtual string Foo() {
    return "A";
  }
  public void BaseDumpFoo()
  {
    Console.WriteLine(Foo());
  }
}

abstract class B : A {
  protected override string Foo() {
    return "B";
  }
}

class C : B {
  protected override string Foo() {
    return "C";
  }
  public void DumpFoo()
  {
    Console.WriteLine(Foo());
  }
}

Output is C. Remove Foo implementation from B and the output is still C

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Indeed, I should try reading things more carefully. With A declared as abstract, I'm not sure how the case described is reproducible. +1 –  Cody Gray Nov 23 '10 at 1:32

The problem's that since B is overriding the method, when calling it from C, it never reaches to its implementation in the inheritance hierarchy
what you need to do is define the method in B as new (so that it overrides the implementation from A) and define it also as virtual (so that C can use it's own implementation you would have something like this

abstract class A
{
    protected virtual string Foo()
    {
        return "A";
    }
}

abstract class B : A
{
    protected new virtual string Foo()
    {
        return "B";
    }
}

class C : B
{
    protected override string Foo()
    {
        return "C";
    }
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