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I'm not sure exactly what I need to use as an argument to malloc to allocate space in the table_allocate(int) function. I was thinking just count_table* cTable = malloc(sizeof(count_table*)) , but that doesnt do anything with the size parameter. Am i supposed to allocate space for the list_node_t also? Below is what I am working with.

in the .h file I'm given this signature:

//create a count table struct and allocate space for it                         
//return it as a pointer                                                        
count_table_t* table_allocate(int);

Here are the structs that I'm supposed to use:

typedef struct list_node list_node_t;

struct list_node {
  char *key;
  int value;

  //the next node in the list                                                   
  list_node_t *next;
};

typedef struct count_table count_table_t;

struct count_table {
  int size;
  //an array of list_node pointers                                              
  list_node_t **list_array;
};

Thanks!

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You've got quite a few good answers, but no one yet has noted an important point: int is a signed type, and unless you want to have negative sizes, you should use size_t, which is the type returned by the sizeof operator and passed to malloc and friends, and is intended to be able to store the array index for arrays of any size allowed by the compiler. You probably want size_t size instead of int size. –  Chris Lutz Nov 23 '10 at 5:37

4 Answers 4

count_table* cTable = malloc(sizeof(count_table*))

is wrong. It should be

count_table* cTable = malloc(sizeof(count_table));

Also, you must allocate memory for list_node_t also seperately.

EDIT:

Apart from what Clifford has pointed about allocating memory for the list node, I think the memory allocation should also be taken care for the char *key inside of the list node.

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so in the function I should probably malloc the count_table and then malloc space for the list_node_t and then put that list node inside the count_table? Am I getting this right? –  user516888 Nov 23 '10 at 2:44
    
Yes. You are getting this right. : ) But, please refer to Clifford's answer about your double pointer usage for list_node_t. You need to check why is it given as a double pointer there. Thanks! –  Jay Nov 23 '10 at 2:45
1  
+1 but I would write count_table* cTable = malloc(sizeof *cTable); personally. –  Chris Lutz Nov 23 '10 at 5:27
    
@Chris Lutz: Good point; greater maintainability. –  Clifford Nov 23 '10 at 11:04
    
@Chris Lutz & Clifford, I do agree with your ideas about this. But, also many a times I have seen people make a typo error and miss the '*' thereby causing only 4 bytes to be allocated. This problem leads to troubles hard to find in a big code. So, am a little confused about this. –  Jay Nov 23 '10 at 11:15

Your suggestion: count_table* cTable = malloc(sizeof(count_table*)) would only allocate space for a pointer to a count_table.

You'd need

count_table* cTable = malloc(sizeof(count_table) ) ;

Each list node would be separately allocated and cTable->size and cTable->list_array and the last list_node_t::next updated accordingly. Maintaining a pointer to the last node added would make adding nodes faster.

I am not sure why count_table::list_array is of type list_node_t** rather than just list_node_t* (and equally called list_array rather than just list). Is it your intention that it is both an array and a list at the same time? That would be somewhat redundant. The member need only be a pointer to the first node, successive nodes are then accessed via list_node::next

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I think by :: you mean . –  detly Nov 23 '10 at 2:44
    
@detley: No I mean :: because the left-hand-side is a type not an instance. I am using C++ scope notation, though it is not intended that this is code, I am simply using it as a notation to refer to a member of a struct rather than member of an instance of a struct. There is no syntactic way of doing that in C. –  Clifford Nov 23 '10 at 2:49
    
what you are saying makes a lot of sense. as for the (int size) parameter... do you think it is intended that I add that many nodes to the count_table in that function? I don't understand what the size parameter is for. –  user516888 Nov 23 '10 at 2:55
1  
I think the idea is that there is an array of lists, so that when a node is hashed, you look in the relevant array entry, then trundle down a singly linked list. That at least makes sense of the data structures. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 23 '10 at 3:18
    
Ohhhhh. wow. Yeah, i see that now. Thanks! –  user516888 Nov 23 '10 at 3:31

Given that the int is a "size" parameter for the created count_table_t, it appears that you are supposed to both allocate the count_table_t itself, as well as initialise its members.

Initialising the list_array member also involves a memory allocation, so it would look like:

count_table_t *table_allocate(int size)
{
    count_table_t *table = malloc(sizeof *table);
    int i;

    table->size = size;
    table->list_array = malloc(size * sizeof table->list_array[0]);
    for (i = 0; i < size; i++)
        table->list_array[i] = NULL;

    return table;
}

However, you also need to check for some error conditions: the multiplication of size by sizeof table->list_array[0] could overflow, and either of the malloc() calls could fail. So the function should actually look like this:

count_table_t *table_allocate(int size)
{
    count_table_t *table;
    int i;

    /* Check for overflow in list allocation size */
    if (size < 0 || size > (size_t)-1 / sizeof table->list_array[0])
        return NULL;

    table = malloc(sizeof *table);

    if (table == NULL)
        return NULL;

    table->size = size;
    table->list_array = malloc(size * sizeof table->list_array[0]);

    if (table->list_array == NULL) {
        free(table);
        return NULL;
    }

    for (i = 0; i < size; i++)
        table->list_array[i] = NULL;

    return table;
}

(Note that (size_t)-1 is a constant equal to the maximum value of a size_t, which is the type of the parameter to malloc()).

share|improve this answer
    
Note also that the OP's int counts should all probably be size_ts. –  Chris Lutz Nov 23 '10 at 5:34
1  
@Chris Lutz: Agreed (and that would remove the need for the < 0 check), but it sounds like the function signature and struct definition were handed-down requirements. –  caf Nov 23 '10 at 5:46

In addition to the other posters who point out that you're only allocating enough space for the pointer, not the space the data you want will occupy, I strongly urge you to do things like this:

count_table* cTable = malloc(sizeof(*cTable));

This will help you in case the type of cTable ever changes, you won't have to adjust two parts to that line, just the type.

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