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I am a C++ noob and I wanna know how can i return an array from a C++ function.
I tried the following code but doesn't seem to work.

char some_function(){
    char my_string[] = "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog";
    return my_string;
}
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The return type for that function is a single character - not an array of characters. However, specifying an array return type won't help much - see wheaties answer. –  Steve314 Nov 23 '10 at 6:05
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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The reason that code isn't working is that the minute the function ends, so does the lifetime of the string you have created. Instead, if you're going to be working in C++ use std::string and return that.

std::string myFunc(){
    return string("hey a new string");
}

For other arrays use std::vector, std::deque or one of the other STL classes. I'd also point you to look at the STL (standard template library):

vector<float> myFunc(){
    vector<float> blah;
    blah.push_back(4.5);
    blah.push_back(5.7);
    return blah;
 }

On returning arrays:

The big problem with pointers and such is object lifetime considerations. Such as the following code:

int* myFunc(){
    int myInt = 4;
    return &myInt;
}

what happens here is that when the function exits myInt no longer exists leaving the pointer that was returned to be pointing at some memory address which may or may not hold the value of 4. If you want to return an array using pointers (I really suggest you don't and use std::vector) it'll have to look something like:

int* myFunc(){
    return new int[4];
}

which uses the new operator.

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Which header should I include ? Can i return an integer array without stl ? –  SteepCurver Nov 23 '10 at 5:45
    
@ScienceCrazy for std::string it's #include <string> and also write using std::string at the top of the file. Also I've editted my answer. I earnestly encourage you not to use naked pointers when returning from a function as the caller doesn't know if they are responsible for cleaning up the memory pointed at. –  wheaties Nov 23 '10 at 5:51
    
You should stick on using std:: everywhere or not using it at all. –  zneak Nov 23 '10 at 5:58
    
Or even better ::std::. See stackoverflow.com/questions/1661912/… –  Omnifarious Nov 23 '10 at 6:08
1  
@ScienceCrazy - if you really want to return an integer array, you need to ensure you're returning a (copy of) an array rather than just a (dangling) pointer. This is possible if you define a struct/class that has an array member, but it's a pain. The normal trick from the C days is to not use a return value, but pass in a parameter that references the location where you'll store the output. This works even better in C++, with reference types. But you should normally still use standard library containers rather than arrays. They are more flexible and robust. –  Steve314 Nov 23 '10 at 6:19
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In C++ it is better to use std::string over an array of char in almost every case.

More generally, consider the STL container classes rather than C-style arrays.

Here are a couple of examples...

#include <string>
#include <vector>

std::string some_function()
{
    return "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog";
}

std::vector<std::string> some_other_function()
{
    std::vector<std::string> stuff;
    stuff.push_back("Spam");
    stuff.push_back("Spam");
    stuff.push_back("Spam");
    stuff.push_back("Spam");
    stuff.push_back("Spam");
    stuff.push_back("Spam");
    stuff.push_back("Spam");
    return stuff;
}
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if you can use a standard container, then you should. In your specific example, the container you should use is std::string, as:

#include <string>
std::string some_function(){
    std::string my_string = "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog";
    return my_string;
}

If, on the other hand, you really need to pass around an actual array, you have to do things a bit more to do. most likely the best choice is to let the caller work out the details of the array, and just pass that as an argument to the callee: this would look like so:

// notice here that we use 'string.h', with the '.h' extension, different from above
#include <string.h>


void some_function(size_t len, char * dest)
{
    std::strncpy(dest, "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog", len);
}

int main()
{
    const std::size_t stringSize = 100;
    char myString[stringSize];
    some_function(stringSize, myString);
}

Another option, though even less desirable in many cases, is to allocate a new area of storage to hold the array.

char* some_function()
{
    char* result = new char[44];
    strcpy(result, "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog");
    return result;
}


int main()
{
    char *myString = some_function();
    // do some stuff with myString
    delete myString[];
}
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The length parameter before the pointer? Yuck! –  Steve314 Nov 23 '10 at 6:23
    
A word of caution on the first example...strncpy() will not include a null terminator if the length of source string >= len. To be safe, you can explicitly add a null (e.g., dest[len - 1] = '\0';) after calling strncpy(). –  cbranch Nov 23 '10 at 6:54
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This will crash because of the memory model.

In C++ (as in many other languages), there are two two popular places where you can allocate memory: the stack and the heap.

In C++, the stack is a special memory region where functions place whatever values they'll need during their execution. The most important thing to remember is that whatever lives there gets deleted once the function returns. That means that if you return a pointer to something on the stack, your program is bound to crash because whatever was there isn't anymore. That's what you'd be doing if you returned an array.

Hopefully, there's a place where data can live forever ("forever" being the duration of your program): the heap. If you allocate something on the heap, it won't get cleared away when the function returns. However, it implies additional bookkeeping, since you could easily lose all references to a certain block of allocated memory; and if you do, there's no way to reclaim it (that's called a leak, and it's a very bad thing). Therefore, a rule was suggested: if a function allocates memory on the heap, it should be responsible for freeing it. Problem is, if your function returns allocated memory, it obvisouly can't dispose of it. Therefore, you shouldn't allocate memory on the heap and return it.

So, if you can't allocate your array on the stack, and you can't return a pointer to memory on the heap, what can you do?

I suggest you use C++ types to solve your problem. If you're about to use an array of characters, the best would be a std::string (#include <string>). If you're about to use an array of whatever else, the best would probably be a std::vector<YourTypeHere> (#include <vector>). Both manage their own memory, and therefore it's safe to return them.

There's ample documentation for both on here and Google. Here's a quick example anyways.

std::vector<int> foo()
{
    std::vector<int> my_vector;
    my_vector.push_back(1);
    my_vector.push_back(2);
    my_vector.push_back(3);
    return my_vector;
}

std::string bar()
{
    std::string my_string = "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog";
    return my_string;
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> my_vector = foo();
    // will print 123
    std::cout << my_vector[0] << my_vector[1] << my_vector[2] << std::endl;

    std::string my_string = bar();
    // will print The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
    std::cout << my_string << std::endl;
}
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This is not true for string-literals though: stackoverflow.com/questions/2327841/… –  Andreas Brinck Nov 23 '10 at 5:51
    
@Andreas Brinck String literals live on the data segment of your executable, so feel free to return pointers to them whenever you want. –  zneak Nov 23 '10 at 5:56
    
That was kind of my point ;) –  Andreas Brinck Nov 23 '10 at 6:07
    
@Andreas Brinck Great then! We agree. –  zneak Nov 23 '10 at 12:13
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That's because the variable you are trying to return from the function call is a temporary variable which is created in stack and the stack variables are cleared once the control comes out of the block. So the pointer you have returned points to a variable which has been deleted.

One of the alternative if you want to return something from a function is you pass an address that function and put the variable in that address

void some_function(string& some_string){
    char my_string[] = "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog";
    some_string = my_string;
}
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There are two ways to do this without STL. One is using an 'out' parameter, and the other is by abusing a structure. Here is how the first works:

#include <cstddef>  // For ::std::size_t
#include <cstring>  // For strncpy
void some_function(char retval[], ::std::size_t retval_len) {
    char my_string[] = "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog";
    ::std::strncpy(retval, my_string, retval_len);
}

Here is how the second would work:

struct array_struct {
    char the_array[50];
};

array_struct some_function() {
    array_struct ary = { "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" };
    return ary;
}
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