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Making game of life I need to a have a grid that is 30x20 (X * Y). The problem is (I had another question regarding to that) that the c# arrays are rows, columns. So when I use CursorPosition() to drawing I need to swap it because it wants column at first. Is there any way how I can reverse it so I can use like this?

int [,] Array = new int[30,20];
Console.SetCursorPosition(29,19) // now its vice versa, I would need to use 19,29.
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I believe that this is purely conceptual (c# arrays are neither row/col or col/row that is up to the developer) and comes down to iterating your array in either a depth-first or breadth-first manner e.g.

//Breadth-first
for(int x = 0; x < col.Length; x++)
{    
     for(int y = 0; y < row.Length; y++)
     {             
     }    
}

//Depth-first
for(int y = 0; y < row.Length; y++)
{    
     for(int x = 0; x < col.Length; x++)
     {    
     }    
}
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Look at MSDN - it is really rows, column –  Loj Nov 23 '10 at 7:43
1  
"conceptual" being the operative word here... do they define 5,6,7D arrays also in MSDN? Thinking about a 2D array as row/col is just making life hard for yourself. –  Rob Nov 23 '10 at 8:27

At first I was inclined to answer no as the parameters to Console.SetCursorPosition is Positional parameters. But when I remember that C# have Named parameters too so something like this works.

int a = 10;
int b = 20;
Console.SetCursorPosition(top: a, left: b);

This is the closest you can get, if you want to know why, search for the terms above

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What you need is a data structure to store date in relation with an x,y coordinate.

You do not have to use a multi-dimensional array for this. You could very easily create a class that hides the specific implementation from the other classes.

In fact this will make your design more robust.

You can store the data in a database, bitarray, single dimension array, etc.

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Class might be an overkill. –  Sidharth Panwar Nov 23 '10 at 8:33
    
Hiding implementation details is rarely overkill. If the methods are small, they will be inlined (no perf overhead), but it will make your consuming classes cleaner. –  GvS Nov 23 '10 at 8:39

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