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I'm creating a small wrapper for HTML5 canvas, and one thing I'm doing is returning self/this from each of my wrapped methods to make easy call chaining.

For lack of a better name i'm calling my wrapper Canvas. It basically wraps the canvas and context together.

One thing I did is add the below methods to the Canvas.prototype

Canvas.fn = Canvas.prototype = {
    save: function () { this.ctx.save(); return this; },
    restore: function () { this.ctx.restore(); return this; },
    scale: function (x, y) { this.ctx.scale(x, y); return this; },
    rotate: function (angle) { this.ctx.rotate(angle); return this; },
    translate: function (x, y) { this.ctx.translate(x, y); return this; },
    transform: function (a,b,c,d,e,f) { this.ctx.transform(a,b,c,d,e,f); return this; },

Is there an easier way to add these methods using some delegate? Maybe with an array or the function names? Note that some methods take arguments and I want to pass them as is to the actual self.ctx method.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like this?

var functionNames = ['save', 'restore', 'scale', 'rotate', 'translate', 'transform'];

for(var i = 0; i < functionNames.length; i++) {
    (function(funcName) {
        this[funcName] = function() {
            this.ctx[funcName].apply(this.ctx, arguments);
            return this;
        };
    )(functionNames[i]);
}
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You have some typos: int=>var, functions => functionNames. –  Ayman Nov 23 '10 at 9:26
    
This would not work, because at time of calling, the functionNames[i] is not known, so I get an error of apply called on undefined. –  Ayman Nov 23 '10 at 9:27
    
@Ayman: Ok, I think that should be fixed now. I fixed the typos, and introduced some closures. –  Eric Nov 23 '10 at 13:19
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Similar to Eric's answer, also based on http://seewhatever.de/blog/?p=440:

function CanvasWrapper(canvas)
{
    // Call this with new ... or not
    if(!(this instanceof CanvasWrapper)){
        return new CanvasWrapper(canvas);
    }

    var self = this,
        ctx = canvas.getContext('2d'),
        props = [
            'fillStyle', 'strokeStyle'
            // ...
        ],
        meths = [
            'fillRect', 'strokeRect', 'clearRect',
            'beginPath', 'closePath',
            'moveTo', 'lineTo', 'arc',
            'stroke'
            // ...
        ],
        nonChainableMeths = [
            'createLinearGradient'
        ],
        i, prop, meth;

    // Create and set jQuery-like property accessors
    // With no arguments they return the prop value
    // With one argument they set the prop value and return self
    function createAccessor(ctx, prop, self)
    {
        return function(){
            if(arguments.length == 1)
            {
                ctx[prop] = arguments[0];
                return self;
            }
            else
            {
                return ctx[prop];
            }
        }
    }
    for(i = 0; i < props.length; ++i)
    {
        prop = props[i];
        self[prop] = createAccessor(ctx, prop, self);
    }

    // Create and set chainable delegate methods
    function createDelegate(ctx, meth, self)
    {
        return function(){
            ctx[meth].apply(ctx, arguments);
            return self;
        }
    }
    for(i = 0; i < meths.length; ++i)
    {
        meth = meths[i];
        self[meth] = createDelegate(ctx, meth, self);
    }

    // Create and set non-chainable delegate methods
    function createNCDelegate(ctx, meth, self)
    {
        return function(){
            return ctx[meth].apply(ctx, arguments);
        }
    }
    for(i = 0; i < nonChainableMeths.length; ++i)
    {
        meth = nonChainableMeths[i];
        self[meth] = createNCDelegate(ctx, meth, self);
    }
    return self;
}
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If you think it looks cleaner, you can also drop ctx and self from the signatures of the delegate creator functions; so createAccessor(ctx, prop, self) becomes createAccessor(prop), etc. These creator functions act as closures where the property names are safely kept, so they can be used in the anonymous functions inside. ` –  Zecc Nov 23 '10 at 13:19
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A continuation of Eric's answer that does work is given below:

var funs = ['save', 'restore', 'scale', 'rotate', 'translate',
    'transform'];
var f;
for(var i = 0; i < funs.length; i++) {
    f = funs[i];
    self[f] = new Function("this.ctx." + 
            f + ".apply(this.ctx, arguments);  return this;");
}

But I do not like the use of the Function constructor and that my function is a made from a string.

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