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As far as I understand, C++ default copy constructor only behaves as expected when the class is a POD class.

I would like to know if there's a solution for preventing the programmer to write code which (implicitely or not) uses the default copy constructor if the object is not POD.

I know you can always make your copy and assignement private to solve this problem but I'd like to know if there's an automated solution. For example the compiler could generate a warning in case your code generates a default copy constructor call and your class is not POD ?

The goal here is to detect the cases where I forgot to declare copy/assignement private or to manually define them.

Also do you guys know if cppcheck can do that ?

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"C++ default copy constructor only behaves as expected when the class is a POD class." -- This is false. As long as all of it's members copy correctly, the default copy constructor should be fine. For example, if my class has an vector<string>, that will copy fine with the default copy constructor, because it will call the copy constructor of vector, which in turn will call the copy constructor of each of it's strings. –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 23 '10 at 11:43
    
Good point. Then there's probably no simple solution to this problem . The compiler would have to go trough all the inheritance/composition graphs to see if all the members either have copy constructors defined, either are POD, I guess :/ –  Dinaiz Nov 24 '10 at 1:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The centralized way to disable default construction is to make the default constructor inaccessible.

You write: "I would like to know if there's a solution for preventing the programmer to write code which (implicitely or not) uses the default copy constructor if the object is not POD. ."

Presumably you mean you'd like the compiler to react to any default construction of any non-POD object.

Sorry, no compiler-independent way.

Reason: a great many non-POD classes, like smart pointers and containers such as std::vector, rely on default construction to be useful.

The g++ compiler has an option -Weffc++ to warn about violations of the guidelines in Scott Meyers’ Effective C++, but as far as I know – I could be wrong – this does not include your case. Can reportedly be useful, though.

Cheers & hth.,

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"Sorry, no compiler-independent way" : is there a compiler dependant way ? I'm using Visual studio 2008. –  Dinaiz Nov 23 '10 at 12:33
    
Actually after some research, -Weffc++ does more or less what I want (partyly but that was my main use case) From g++ man page : Warn about violations of the following style guidelines from Scott Meyers' Effective C ++ book: Item 11: Define a copy constructor and an assignment operator for classes with dynamically allocated memory. –  Dinaiz Nov 23 '10 at 12:40

In C++0x you can explicitly prevent use of special member functions like this:

struct NonCopyable {
    NonCopyable & operator=(const NonCopyable&) = delete;
    NonCopyable(const NonCopyable&) = delete;
    NonCopyable() = default;
};

See here for more details. Still manual unfortunately, but more elegant than now.

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No, since it is a language's requirement.

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When creating a class, you have 3 possibilities: to have default copy ctor, to write your own or to disable it (with different ways to do it; inheriting from boost::noncopyable to mention one). Not that clear why compiler should warn you about choosing one of these.

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