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I'm using a ManyToManyField with a 'through' class and this results in a lot of queries when fetching a list of things. I'm wondering if there's a more efficient way.

For example here are some simplified classes describing Books and their several authors, which goes through a Role class (to define roles like "Editor", "Illustrator", etc):

class Person(models.Model):
    first_name = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    last_name = models.CharField(max_length=100)

    @property
    def full_name(self):
        return ' '.join([self.first_name, self.last_name,])

class Role(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=50)
    person = models.ForeignKey(Person)
    book = models.ForeignKey(Book)

class Book(models.Model):
    title = models.CharField(max_length=255)
    authors = models.ManyToManyField(Person, through='Role')

    @property
    def authors_names(self):
        names = []
        for role in self.role_set.all():
            person_name = role.person.full_name
            if role.name:
                person_name += ' (%s)' % (role.name,)
            names.append(person_name)
        return ', '.join(names)

If I call Book.authors_names() then I can get a string something like this:

John Doe (Editor), Fred Bloggs, Billy Bob (Illustrator)

It works fine but it does one query to get the Roles for the book, and then another query for every Person. If I'm displaying a list of Books, this adds up to a lot of queries.

Is there a way to do this more efficiently, in a single query per Book, with a join? Or is the only way to use something like batch-select?

(For bonus points... my coding of authors_names() looks a bit clunky - is there a way to make it more elegantly Python-esque?)

share|improve this question
1  
'Python-esque' is usually reserved for comparisons to Monty Python: the word you're looking for is 'Pythonic'. –  Daniel Roseman Nov 23 '10 at 12:38
1  
@daniel: +1 for the correct usage of 'pythonic', though the usage of 'python-esque' may imply that the author is seeking to make the code a bit funnier... –  Bernhard Vallant Nov 23 '10 at 12:51
3  
Thanks for the correction. However, I will from now on endeavour to make my code not only more correct but also funnier. –  Phil Gyford Nov 23 '10 at 13:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is a pattern I come across often in Django. It's really easy to create properties such as your author_name, and they work great when you display one book, but the number of queries explodes when you want to use the property for many books on a page.

Firstly, you can use select_related to prevent the lookup for every person

  for role in self.role_set.all().select_related(depth=1):
        person_name = role.person.full_name
        if role.name:
            person_name += ' (%s)' % (role.name,)
        names.append(person_name)
    return ', '.join(names)

However, this doesn't solve the problem of looking up the roles for every book.

If you are displaying a list of books, you can look up all the roles for your books in one query, then cache them.

>>> books = Book.objects.filter(**your_kwargs)
>>> roles = Role.objects.filter(book_in=books).select_related(depth=1)
>>> roles_by_book = defaultdict(list)
>>> for role in roles:
...    roles_by_book[role.book].append(books)    

You can then access a book's roles through the roles_by_dict dictionary.

>>> for book in books:
...    book_roles = roles_by_book[book]

You will have to rethink your author_name property to use caching like this.


I'll shoot for the bonus points as well.

Add a method to role to render the full name and role name.

class Role(models.Model):
    ...
    @property
    def name_and_role(self):
        out = self.person.full_name
        if self.name:
            out += ' (%s)' % role.name
        return out

The author_names collapses to a one liner similar to Paulo's suggestion

@property
def authors_names(self):
   return ', '.join([role.name_and_role for role in self.role_set.all() ])
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, great thanks for the select_related() pointer Alasdair, that's an improvement. I'll have to think how best to use the second part of your answer in my code. Maybe in a custom Manager? –  Phil Gyford Nov 23 '10 at 13:47
    
I hadn't come across batch-select before, but it looks promising. I might investigate that before trying to write my own custom manager. –  Alasdair Nov 23 '10 at 15:37
    
Role.__unicode__ is an ideal candidate for rendering –  Paulo Scardine Nov 23 '10 at 18:01

I would make authors = models.ManyToManyField(Role) and store fullname at Role.alias, because same person can sign books under distinct pseudonyms.

About the clunky, this:

def authors_names(self):
    names = []
    for role in self.role_set.all():
        person_name = role.person.full_name
        if role.name:
            person_name += ' (%s)' % (role.name,)
        names.append(person_name)
    return ', '.join(names)

Could be:

def authors_names(self):
   return ', '.join([ '%s (%s)' % (role.person.full_name, role.name) 
                 for role in self.role_set.all() ])
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not worried about pseudonyms to be honest - for this project's purposes, an author's name, pseudonymous or not is the person. –  Phil Gyford Nov 23 '10 at 13:39
    
And thanks for the code suggestion. But that doesn't do exactly the same thing - if there is no role.name I don't want empty parentheses after the author's name. –  Phil Gyford Nov 23 '10 at 13:40

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