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I have something like the following in C#:

private double _x;
private bool _xCalculated;

private double GetX() {
    if (!_xCalculated) {
        _x = ... // some relatively expensive calculation
        _xCalculated = true;
    }

    return _x;
}

My question is, is this thread-safe? As far as I can tell, the worst outcome of this is that two or more threads enter this method at the same time and calculate _x multiple times, but the result is guaranteed to be the same for any instance of this class, so that's not a particularly huge problem.

Is my understanding of this correct?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A few observations:

  1. The store into the double might not be atomic
  2. The write to the bool should be atomic
  3. Depending on the CPU architecture memory operations might be reordered
  4. If no reordering occurs the code should work

While I think the x86 memory ordering guarantees make this safe I'm not entirely sure about that. The memory ordering guarantees of .net have been strengthened recently(I think in .net 4) to match the guarantees of x86.

Memory Model in .net
More on memory ordering
This states that stores are not reordered in .net which I think means that your code is safe. But lockless programming is hard, so I might be overlooking some subtle issues. Perhaps the read in the if clause can cause problems.

I recommend not using this code unless you're a threading expert and really really need the performance. Else just use something more explicit like locks. Locks are not that expensive if they're not contended.

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1  
Indeed. Why speculate on how hardware X might work whilst Y might not, when a LOCK is simpler, clearer, guaranteed and the performance difference isn't worth talking about? –  smirkingman Nov 23 '10 at 13:20
    
I will be doing performance tests to find the best implementation for my purposes, but I wanted to know whether this solution is valid to start with. –  derkyjadex Nov 23 '10 at 13:55
    
The problem with your solution is that it's so hard to know if it is correct. And since threading issues are non deterministic you can't even simply test it. –  CodesInChaos Nov 23 '10 at 13:56

It is not thread-safe. And yes, your understanding is correct. You could use the lock() statement to make it thread-safe.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/c5kehkcz(VS.71).aspx

private object objLock = new object();
private double GetX() {
    lock(objLock) {
        if (!_xCalculated) { 
            _x = ... // some relatively expensive calculation 
            _xCalculated = true; 
        } 
    }
    return _x; 
} 
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1  
Please avoid using lock(this). It's better to lock on an private object lockObject = new object(); See toolazy.me.uk/… –  Lars Truijens Nov 23 '10 at 12:26
    
And stating that it's not safe is a bold claim without giving some reasons for that claim. –  CodesInChaos Nov 23 '10 at 12:35
1  
I think the code is safe as long as it does the three steps in the written order and the calculation is side-effect free. i.e. 1) Read and compare flag 2) Write Double 3) Write Flag atomically. Can you give a counter example? –  CodesInChaos Nov 23 '10 at 13:03
1  
between read/compare and writing of the flag, another thread could read/compare the flag. It will still be false, so the expensive calculation will be executed multiple times. So it is not thread safe. –  Hinek Nov 23 '10 at 13:08
1  
I'm willing to accept the possibility of the calculation running multiple times. It's not /that/ expensive and the number of reads for _x will greatly outnumber the number of threads running the code, so the benefit of the cached result should still outweigh the extra calculations. –  derkyjadex Nov 23 '10 at 13:14

It depends on the platform, I don't think this is safe with the .NET memory model as per its spec, but I think it is OK on the current Microsoft CLR. The issue is the extent a CPU is allowed to reorder memory writes.

Can someone please come up with the detailed links to the spec...

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