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I have a case that I could not find a proper solution. I need to have template base class and a manager class that does some work to that base class. Here is the code

class Base;

class Manager
{
public:
    void DoSomethingTo(Base * bclass)
    {
        if(bclass->PrivateVar == 0)
            // Some code
    }
}

class Base
{
protected: 
    int PrivateVar;
friend class Manager;
};

template<class T>
class TempBase : public Base
{
private:
    Manager * man;
public:
    void DoWork()
    {
        PrivateVar = 0;
        man->DoSomethingTo(this);
    }
}

My problem is PrivateVar variable actually must be private to TempBase and not be accesible from classes derived from TempBase, but since I can not pass its pointer to Manager::DoSomethingTo(), I have to derive it from Base class and Base class must own the PrivateVar. And since I use PrivateVar in TempBase it can not be private to Base, which makes it accessible from the child classes of TempBase.

How can I write the TempBase class so that PrivateVar is a private member whereas it can be reached from Manager::DoSomethingTo() ?

Thanks

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Remove access protection inside Base, then inherit privately.

class Manager
{
public:
    void DoSomethingTo(struct Base * bclass);
};

struct Base
{
    int PrivateVar;
};

void Manager::DoSomethingTo(struct Base * bclass)
{
    if(bclass->PrivateVar == 0)
        ; // Some code
}

template<class T>
class TempBase : private Base
{
private:
    Manager * man;
public:
    void DoWork()
    {
        PrivateVar = 0;
        man->DoSomethingTo(this);
    }
};
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First of all, let's start the flame war:

There is never a reason for an attribute of a class to be protected. It shall either be private (in most cases) or perhaps in some corner cases public. Note that because every derived classes would see a protected attribute, protected only brings a false sense of security: one cannot control any invariant on a protected attribute, so it's essentially a public one, with a comment Don't Touch on top of it.

Now that this is said and done, I would propose to simply change this to:

class Base {};
template <typename T> class TBase;

class DoKey { template <typename T> friend class TBase; DoKey(); };

class Manager
{
public:
  void DoSomethingTo(Base& base, DoKey const& key);
};

template <typename T>
class TBase: public Base
{
public:
  void Do()
  {
    Manager manager;
    if (PrivateVar == 0) { manager.DoSomething(*this, DoKey()); }
  }

private:
  int PrivateVar;
};

By delegating the responsibility of the test to the owner of the variable, we gently circle around all our worries. Of course if we need multiple classes to behave in a similar fashion, then we could introduce a pure virtual void ShouldIDoSomething() const in Base and check it in the Manager's method.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not sure about what DoKey is here for. –  ali_bahoo Nov 23 '10 at 13:21
1  
@Bahadir: it's an access controller. Only classes declared as friend by DoKey may build a DoKey instance, and thus only them may call the Manager class DoSomethingTo method. It's a substitute for using friend directly in Manager, which only grants access to 1 method instead of the whole class internals, and thus reduce the dependencies. –  Matthieu M. Nov 23 '10 at 13:40

You could put a protected member function into Base itself:

class Base
{
protected:
   void sendPrivateVarToManager( Manager& manager )
   {
      manager.DoSomethingToPrivateVar( privateVar );
   }
};

As Base is not a template the implementation could actually be put outside of Base.

Your other issue is you want privateVar to exist in Base, be visible to TempBase but not anything further down the hierarchy. Either you could move it into TempBase in which case you can also put sendPrivateVarToManager in that class although then you'd have to implement it, or pass privateVar as a parameter to that too. Your other option would be to make TempBase a friend of Base but that seems wrong. I am not sure why TempBase needs access.

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from the design, I am not sure why Base needs access. Apparently PrivateVar is purely a TempBase thing that got move to Base so that Manager could access it. I have had the impression of unraveling a plate of spaghetti while reading the code :/ –  Matthieu M. Nov 23 '10 at 13:09
    
@Matthieu M.: You are absolutely right about why Base need access. And sorry about the messy code. –  ali_bahoo Nov 23 '10 at 13:19
    
@Bahadir: no worry, when one is stuck with a technical issue it naturally tends to be reflected in the design. I can claim several contorted designs of my own, some of wish I still have the honor of maintaining :D –  Matthieu M. Nov 23 '10 at 15:26

You can make PrivateVar private, and make both TempBase and Manager friends of Base. See here. Note that this code is not the cleanest one.

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I thought that I could put a public pure virtual function to Base to retrieve PrivateVar, while keeping PrivateVar in TempBase.

class Manager
{
public:
    void DoSomethingTo(Base * bclass)
    {
        if(bclass->GetPrivateVar() == 0)
            // Some code
    }
}
class Base
{
private:
virtual int GetPrivateVar() = 0;  
friend class Manager;
};

template<class T>
class TempBase : public Base
{
private:
    Manager * man;
    int PrivateVar;
    int GetPrivateVar() {return PrivateVar;}
public:
    void DoWork()
    {
        PrivateVar = 0;
        // Some code
        man->DoSomethingTo(this);
        // Some code
    }
friend class Manager;
}
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