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It's been a while since I wrote html full-time ;-p

In the modern era of css etc, what is the preferred way of creating a pair of panels (for example, a preview window like in Outlook, or for master/detail views)? Ideally where the top (master) pane would get scrollbars etc?

The intended use-case is so that a user can scroll in the top window while always being able to see the preview / detail window (I intend to load data for the selected row into the bottom panel via jQuery).

In the old world (table layouts), I might have something like:

<html>
<body>
<table height="100%" border="1" width="100%">
<tr height="*"><td>master</td></tr>
<tr height="100"><td>detail</td></tr>
</body>
</html>

So how does this translate to css? (and in particular, getting the scrollbars on the two windows).

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Well, if you're actually using windows, then it sounds like you're talking about frames or even iFrames.

My assumption, though, is that when you say "window" you're just referring to the idea of a scrollable area. To do that, the css property "overflow" can be set to "scroll" and it will scroll if the contained elements size is larger than that of itself.

A simple code sample:

<html>
  <body>
    <div id="window-one">
      <p>Content for window one goes here.</p>
    </div>
    <div id="window-two">
      <p>Content for window two goes here.</p>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

The CSS would like this:

#window-one,
#window-two {
    width: 100%;
    height: 50%;
    overflow: scroll;
}

This would create two "panes" (windows) that take up 50% of the height, but span the entire width of window. Scrollbars would be automatically set on the panes, even if not needed (in which case they're disabled.)

share|improve this answer
1  
All 3 are good answers. I'd probably use a class rather than the id match, but that isn't important to the point of the answer. Thanks again. – Marc Gravell Jan 8 '09 at 20:46

There are lots of good ways to do this - you could use any block level element (like a div) with overflow:scroll. This would allow you do do what you want without resorting to something complicated like frames (unless that is what you need).

Try something like this:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
    	"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">
    <head>
    	<title>untitled</title>
    	<style type="text/css">
    		.pane {
    			margin:20px;
    			width:300px;
    			height:100px;
    			overflow:scroll;
    		}
    	</style>
    </head>
    <body>
    	<div class="pane">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Proin ac ipsum id diam ullamcorper viverra. Ut nec risus. Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Pellentesque pulvinar. Integer vel est. Sed elementum, tortor nec sollicitudin semper, eros purus suscipit pede, in dictum metus ligula id mauris. Donec augue metus, malesuada a, ultricies eu, volutpat quis, est. Fusce suscipit. Mauris magna. Nulla facilisi. Praesent sem odio, imperdiet ac, vestibulum quis, lacinia eget, nibh. Nunc faucibus pede nec pede. Duis eget risus. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Cras nunc odio, tempus et, condimentum ut, lacinia quis, est. Fusce ipsum metus, accumsan a, faucibus et, semper vitae, pede. Cras est. Vivamus metus dui, lobortis at, fermentum cursus, dapibus eget, orci. Cras imperdiet. </div>
    	<div class="pane">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Proin ac ipsum id diam ullamcorper viverra. Ut nec risus. Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Pellentesque pulvinar. Integer vel est. Sed elementum, tortor nec sollicitudin semper, eros purus suscipit pede, in dictum metus ligula id mauris. Donec augue metus, malesuada a, ultricies eu, volutpat quis, est. Fusce suscipit. Mauris magna. Nulla facilisi. Praesent sem odio, imperdiet ac, vestibulum quis, lacinia eget, nibh. Nunc faucibus pede nec pede. Duis eget risus. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Cras nunc odio, tempus et, condimentum ut, lacinia quis, est. Fusce ipsum metus, accumsan a, faucibus et, semper vitae, pede. Cras est. Vivamus metus dui, lobortis at, fermentum cursus, dapibus eget, orci. Cras imperdiet. </div>
    </body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
1  
All 3 are good answers, thanks. – Marc Gravell Jan 8 '09 at 20:44
<html>
<body>
    <div style="height: 70%; border: 1px solid #000; overflow: auto;">
        <div style="background: #ddd; height: 1000px;">master</div>
    </div>
    <div style="height: 30%; border: 1px solid; #000; overflow: auto;">
        <div style="background: #ddd; height: 1000px;">detail</div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
All 3 are good answers, thanks. – Marc Gravell Jan 8 '09 at 20:45

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