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Here's a shell script:

globvar=0

function myfunc {
  let globvar=globvar+1
  echo "myfunc: $globvar"
}

myfunc
echo "something" | myfunc

echo "Global: $globvar"

When called, it prints out the following:

$ sh zzz.sh
myfunc: 1
myfunc: 2
Global: 1
$ bash zzz.sh
myfunc: 1
myfunc: 2
Global: 1
$ zsh zzz.sh
myfunc: 1
myfunc: 2
Global: 2

The question is: why this happens and what behaviour is correct?

P.S. I have a strange feeling that function behind the pipe is called in a forked shell... So, can there be a simple workaround?

P.P.S. This function is a simple test wrapper. It runs test application and analyzes its output. Then it increments $PASSED or $FAILED variables. Finally, you get a number of passed/failed tests in global variables. The usage is like:

test-util << EOF | myfunc
input for test #1
EOF
test-util << EOF | myfunc
input for test #2
EOF
echo "Passed: $PASSED, failed: $FAILED"

Thanks, Serge

share|improve this question
    
Have you read: tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/localvar.html ? –  Dave Jarvis Nov 23 '10 at 15:13
    
well, to my mind $globvar is not a local variable, because calling myfunc() without a pipe increments the global variable $globvar pretty well. The problem is that calling function over pipe doesn't work in bash/sh. –  zserge Nov 23 '10 at 15:15
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Korn shell gives the same results as zsh, by the way.

Please see BashFAQ/024. Pipes create subshells in Bash and variables are lost when subshells exit.

Based on your example, I would restructure it something like this:

globvar=0

function myfunc {
    echo $(($1 + 1))
}

myfunc "$globvar"
globalvar=$(echo "something" | myfunc "$globalvar")
share|improve this answer
    
Thank for the link! The question is how to pass back two variables: $PASSED and $FAILED. I understand, that I can look for $?, if it equals zero - increment $PASSED by my own, otherwise - increment $FAILED. I just would like to as little code as possible outside the myfunc(). –  zserge Nov 23 '10 at 15:36
    
@zserge: One way would be like this: myfunc() { echo "two words"; }; read word1 word2 <<< $(myfunc) or array=($(myfunc)). –  Dennis Williamson Nov 23 '10 at 15:49
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Piping something into myfunc in sh or bash causes a new shell to spawn. You can confirm this by adding a long sleep in myfunc. While it's sleeping call ps and you'll see a subprocess. When the function returns, that sub shell exits without changing the value in the parent process.

If you really need that value to be changed, you'll need to return a value from the function and check $PIPESTATUS after, I guess, like this:

globvar=0

function myfunc {
  let globvar=globvar+1
  echo "myfunc: $globvar"
  return $globvar
}

myfunc
echo "something" | myfunc
globvar=${PIPESTATUS[1]}

echo "Global: $globvar"
share|improve this answer
    
Cool. I didn't know about PIPESTATUS before. –  dennycrane Nov 23 '10 at 15:32
    
The only problem with this technique is that your return value has to be in the range 0-255. –  Dennis Williamson Nov 23 '10 at 15:40
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Use export instead of let, otherwise the variable is local (use $(()) as well to do arithmetic operation)

export globvar=0

function myfunc {
  export globvar=$((globvar+1))
  echo "myfunc: $globvar"
}
share|improve this answer
    
but exported variables do not return back to the caller shell, so if you call your function over pipe, your global variable will remain unchanged (tested on bash) –  zserge Nov 23 '10 at 15:39
    
my mistake, I didn't see the | problem. Why do you need to call a new shell rather than just calling the script ? –  mb14 Nov 23 '10 at 15:45
    
Actually, I don't. I just need to redirect an output from test program to the shell function to find out if test succeeded. A clear way to redirecting output is a pipe, but pipe forks a sub-shell. –  zserge Nov 23 '10 at 15:56
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The problem is 'which end of a pipeline using built-ins is executed by the original process?'

In zsh, it looks like the last command in the pipeline is executed by the main shell script when the command is a function or built-in.

In Bash (and sh is likely to be a link to Bash if you're on Linux), then either both commands are run in a sub-shell or the first command is run by the main process and the others are run by sub-shells.

Clearly, when the function is run in a sub-shell, it does not affect the variable in the parent shell (only the global in the sub-shell).

Consider adding an extra test:

echo Something | { myfunc; echo $globvar; }
echo $globvar
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