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I want to have a build number "hardwired" (compile-time constant) into a class, for example:

public class Domain
{
    public string Build { get { return "CONST-BUILD-VERSION-HERE"; } }

    ...
}

How can I accomplish this?

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I think we need more information here, I'm not sure what you're trying to do. – Noldorin Nov 23 '10 at 16:34
    
Wouldn't you do it just as you've posted? – Brad Nov 23 '10 at 16:35
    
more info needed – TalentTuner Nov 23 '10 at 16:35
    
The effect of compiling the project must be that the "CONST-BUILD VERSION-HERE" has a new value and is compiled into the binaries with the new constant. – Bent Rasmussen Nov 23 '10 at 16:37

Have you looked at getting the data out of the AssemblyInfo.cs?

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That would be the way I would go – Richard J. Ross III Nov 23 '10 at 16:36
1  
Add this link...Google search results are annoying...msbuildextensionpack.com/help/3.5.4.0/html/… – Aaron McIver Nov 23 '10 at 16:37
    
As I understand it, what he wants is to get the data into AssemblyInfo.cs. – Jon Nov 23 '10 at 16:58

This would have to be done as a pre-build step.

At some point in the past I devised this batch file to do the trick for a C++ project:

@echo off
SETLOCAL
SET CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_CONST=
SET CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_BUILD=
SET CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_FNAME=
SET CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_FILE=build_autoinc.conf
IF NOT "%1"=="" SET CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_FILE=%1
IF NOT EXIST "%CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_FILE%" GOTO noversionfile

:configfromfile
FOR /F "tokens=1,2 delims== " %%i IN (%CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_FILE%) DO SET %%i=%%j

if "%CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_CONST%"=="" goto noconstname
if "%CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_BUILD%"=="" goto nobuildnum
if "%CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_FNAME%"=="" goto nofilename

echo Auto-incrementing build number in %CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_FNAME%...
SET /A CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_BUILD = %CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_BUILD% + 1
>%CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_FILE% echo CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_CONST=%CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_CONST%
>>%CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_FILE% echo CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_BUILD=%CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_BUILD%
>>%CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_FILE% echo CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_FNAME=%CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_FNAME%
>%CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_FNAME% echo #define %CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_CONST% %CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_BUILD%
goto end

:noconstname
:nobuildnum
echo CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC : error
exit /b 2

:noversionfile
echo CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC : error: version file %CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_FILE% does not exist
exit /b 1

:end
exit /b 0

The idea is:

You have a file (build_autoinc.conf) in your sources. This file contains configuration for the specific application (so that the batch file can be reused without changes).

build_autoinc.conf looks like this:

CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_CONST=VERSION
CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_BUILD=1
CPP_BUILD_AUTOINC_FNAME=version.cpp

So when the batch file is run, it creates (overwrites) the file version.cpp with the contents:

#define VERSION 1

and also increments the build number in build_autoinc.conf.

You can adapt this to work with a C# project quite easily, and set a pre-build step to run the batch file. A word of warning, however: since version.cpp (or your equivalent) is overwritten before each build, the build system will ALWAYS think that since files have changed, a new build has to be made. So you can't, for example, hit "build" to just check if your binary is current and skip the build process if it is.

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This seems closest to what OP wants to do, afai can see. – Steve Townsend Nov 23 '10 at 17:05

You could use the builtin version in AssemblyInfo.cs. Any class in the assembly will have the same version since they all build together.

System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetName().Version; 
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Don't want to use reflection. Must be a compile-time constant in the CS file. – Bent Rasmussen Nov 23 '10 at 16:42
    
Have a prebuild step that generates the code you need, incrementing what's currently in the file to the next value you wish to use. Brittle, but automated. See @Jon's answer for the general idea. – Steve Townsend Nov 23 '10 at 16:45
    
@Bent: Is there a reason it must be a compile-time constant? Reflection is not as slow as people make it out to be - and since this will be a constant, you only really need to calculate the build number once and store the value, meaning the overhead will be 0. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Dec 16 '10 at 17:53
    
@Bent: and if it's for being able to retrieve the version info from outside of the program, directly from the executable-file, that's what AssemblyInfo.cs and the FileVersionInfo class are for – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Dec 16 '10 at 18:24

You can get data out of the Assembly Information using Reflection:

Version: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.reflection.assemblyversionattribute.aspx

Others: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/1h52t681.aspx

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