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I have a list of "Report" objects with three fields (All String type)-

ReportKey
StudentNumber
School

I have a sort code goes like-

Collections.sort(reportList, new Comparator<Report>() {

@Override
public int compare(final Report record1, final Report record2) {
      return (record1.getReportKey() + record1.getStudentNumber() + record1.getSchool())                      
        .compareTo(record2.getReportKey() + record2.getStudentNumber() + record2.getSchool());
      }

});

For some reason, I don't have the sorted order. One advised to put spaces in between fields, but why?

Do you see anything wrong with the code?

share|improve this question
    
Are they fixed-length fields? What happens if record1.getReportKey() is "AB" and record1.getStudentNumber() is "CD", but record2.getReportKey() is "ABCD"? – mellamokb Nov 23 '10 at 17:08
    
Fixed length. Sorry forgot to mention. – Milli Szabo Nov 23 '10 at 17:11
    
possible duplicate of Best way to compare objects by multiple fields? – Benny Bottema Nov 20 '13 at 10:44
up vote 53 down vote accepted

Do you see anything wrong with the code?

Yes. Why are you adding the three fields together before you compare them?

I would probably do something like this: (assuming the fields are in the order you wish to sort them in)

@Override public int compare(final Report record1, final Report record2) {
    int c;
    c = record1.getReportKey().compareTo(record2.getReportKey());
    if (c == 0)
       c = record1.getStudentNumber().compareTo(record2.getStudentNumber());
    if (c == 0)
       c = record1.getSchool().compareTo(record2.getSchool());
    return c;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please elaborate. How do I do that then? Thanks. – Milli Szabo Nov 23 '10 at 17:12
    
Hi, you can add more if (c == 0) ? I don't know if is correct but seems that no, because if the first condition is met never enters the second or third .. etc .. – delive Jan 14 at 14:46
    
I checked not works correctly I don't know why have +50 votes.. – delive Jan 14 at 14:51
    
I don't think you understood a.compareTo(b); the convention is that a value of 0 represents equality, negative integers represent that a < b and positive integers represent that a > b for Comparable a and b. – Jason S Jan 14 at 15:20

I'd make a comparator using Guava's ComparisonChain:

public class ReportComparator implements Comparator<Report> {
  public int compare(Report r1, Report r2) {
    return ComparisonChain.start()
        .compare(r1.getReportKey(), r2.getReportKey())
        .compare(r1.getStudentNumber(), r2.getStudentNumber())
        .compare(r1.getSchool(), r2.getSchool())
        .result();
  }
}
share|improve this answer

(from House of Code)

Working code in this gist

Messy and convoluted: Sorting by hand

Collections.sort(pizzas, new Comparator<Pizza>() {  
    @Override  
    public int compare(Pizza p1, Pizza p2) {  
        int sizeCmp = p1.size.compareTo(p2.size);  
        if (sizeCmp != 0) {  
            return sizeCmp;  
        }  
        int nrOfToppingsCmp = p1.nrOfToppings.compareTo(p2.nrOfToppings);  
        if (nrOfToppingsCmp != 0) {  
            return nrOfToppingsCmp;  
        }  
        return p1.name.compareTo(p2.name);  
    }  
});  

This requires a lot of typing, maintenance and is error prone.

The reflective way: Sorting with BeanComparator

ComparatorChain chain = new ComparatorChain(Arrays.asList(
   new BeanComparator("size"), 
   new BeanComparator("nrOfToppings"), 
   new BeanComparator("name")));

Collections.sort(pizzas, chain);  

Obviously this is is more concise, but even more error prone as you lose your direct reference to the fields by using Strings instead. Now if a field is renamed, the compiler won’t even report a problem. Moreover, because this solution uses reflection, the sorting is much slower.

Getting there: Sorting with Google Guava’s ComparisonChain

Collections.sort(pizzas, new Comparator<Pizza>() {  
    @Override  
    public int compare(Pizza p1, Pizza p2) {  
        return ComparisonChain.start().compare(p1.size, p2.size).compare(p1.nrOfToppings, p2.nrOfToppings).compare(p1.name, p2.name).result();  
        // or in case the fields can be null:  
        /* 
        return ComparisonChain.start() 
           .compare(p1.size, p2.size, Ordering.natural().nullsLast()) 
           .compare(p1.nrOfToppings, p2.nrOfToppings, Ordering.natural().nullsLast()) 
           .compare(p1.name, p2.name, Ordering.natural().nullsLast()) 
           .result(); 
        */  
    }  
});  

This is much better, but requires some boiler plate code for the most common use case: null-values should be valued less by default. For null-fields, you have to provide an extra directive to Guava what to do in that case. This is a flexible mechanism if you want to do something specific, but often you want the default case (ie. 1, a, b, z, null).

Sorting with Apache Commons CompareToBuilder

Collections.sort(pizzas, new Comparator<Pizza>() {  
    @Override  
    public int compare(Pizza p1, Pizza p2) {  
        return new CompareToBuilder().append(p1.size, p2.size).append(p1.nrOfToppings, p2.nrOfToppings).append(p1.name, p2.name).toComparison();  
    }  
});  

Like Guava’s ComparisonChain, this library class sorts easily on multiple fields, but also defines default behavior for null values (ie. 1, a, b, z, null). However, you can’t specify anything else either, unless you provide your own Comparator.

Thus

Ultimately it comes down to flavor and the need for flexibility (Guava’s ComparisonChain) vs. concise code (Apache’s CompareToBuilder).

Bonus method

I found a nice solution that combines multiple comparators in order of priority on CodeReview in a MultiComparator:

class MultiComparator<T> implements Comparator<T> {
    private final List<Comparator<T>> comparators;

    public MultiComparator(List<Comparator<? super T>> comparators) {
        this.comparators = comparators;
    }

    public MultiComparator(Comparator<? super T>... comparators) {
        this(Arrays.asList(comparators));
    }

    public int compare(T o1, T o2) {
        for (Comparator<T> c : comparators) {
            int result = c.compare(o1, o2);
            if (result != 0) {
                return result;
            }
        }
        return 0;
    }

    public static <T> void sort(List<T> list, Comparator<? super T>... comparators) {
        Collections.sort(list, new MultiComparator<T>(comparators));
    }
}

Ofcourse Apache Commons Collections has a util for this already:

ComparatorUtils.chainedComparator(comparatorCollection)

Collections.sort(list, ComparatorUtils.chainedComparator(comparators));
share|improve this answer
    
@Pino fixed it, it was incomplete. – Benny Bottema Mar 22 at 10:11

If you want to sort by report key, then student number, then school, you should do something like this:

public class ReportComparator implements Comparator<Report>
{
    public int compare(Report r1, Report r2)
    {
        int result = r1.getReportKey().compareTo(r2.getReportKey());
        if (result != 0)
        {
            return result;
        }
        result = r1.getStudentNumber().compareTo(r2.getStudentNumber());
        if (result != 0)
        {
            return result;
        }
        return r1.getSchool().compareTo(r2.getSchool());
    }
}

This assumes none of the values can be null, of course - it gets more complicated if you need to allow for null values for the report, report key, student number or school.

While you could get the string concatenation version to work using spaces, it would still fail in strange cases if you had odd data which itself included spaces etc. The above code is the logical code you want... compare by report key first, then only bother with the student number if the report keys are the same, etc.

share|improve this answer
5  
Although there is not "wrong" with this code and I understand it. I prefer Jason's implementation because it seems easier to follow since he only has one return statement. – jzd Nov 23 '10 at 17:24

If the StudentNumber is numeric it will not be sorted numeric but alphanumeric. Do not expect

"2" < "11"

it will be:

"11" < "2"
share|improve this answer

If you want to sort based on ReportKey first then Student Number then School, you need to compare each String instead of concatenating them. Your method might work if you pad the strings with spaces so that each ReportKey is the same length and so on, but it is not really worth the effort. Instead just change the compare method to compare the ReportKeys, if compareTo returns 0 then try StudentNumber, then School.

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This is an old question so I don't see a Java 8 equivalent. Here is an example for this specific case.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.List;

/**
 * Compares multiple parts of the Report object.
 */
public class SimpleJava8ComparatorClass {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Report> reportList = new ArrayList<>();
        reportList.add(new Report("reportKey2", "studentNumber2", "school1"));
        reportList.add(new Report("reportKey4", "studentNumber4", "school6"));
        reportList.add(new Report("reportKey1", "studentNumber1", "school1"));
        reportList.add(new Report("reportKey3", "studentNumber2", "school4"));
        reportList.add(new Report("reportKey2", "studentNumber2", "school3"));

        System.out.println("pre-sorting");
        System.out.println(reportList);
        System.out.println();

        Collections.sort(reportList, Comparator.comparing(Report::getReportKey)
            .thenComparing(Report::getStudentNumber)
            .thenComparing(Report::getSchool));

        System.out.println("post-sorting");
        System.out.println(reportList);
    }

    private static class Report {

        private String reportKey;
        private String studentNumber;
        private String school;

        public Report(String reportKey, String studentNumber, String school) {
            this.reportKey = reportKey;
            this.studentNumber = studentNumber;
            this.school = school;
        }

        public String getReportKey() {
            return reportKey;
        }

        public void setReportKey(String reportKey) {
            this.reportKey = reportKey;
        }

        public String getStudentNumber() {
            return studentNumber;
        }

        public void setStudentNumber(String studentNumber) {
            this.studentNumber = studentNumber;
        }

        public String getSchool() {
            return school;
        }

        public void setSchool(String school) {
            this.school = school;
        }

        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "Report{" +
                   "reportKey='" + reportKey + '\'' +
                   ", studentNumber='" + studentNumber + '\'' +
                   ", school='" + school + '\'' +
                   '}';
        }
    }
}
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