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I have a variable, which is a member of one of my classes, that another is in need of, but I'm not sure how to effectively pass the value between them without using a global variable, which is something I'd like to avoid if at all possible. I know I could create an object, but that would invoke the constructor of the originating class which would execute a number of functions and write the needless results to memory, which would be wasteful of system resources.

Is there an easy way to pass this value between the two functions?


Update: The class that is in need of the variable, called no_of_existing_devices. The purpose of class Initialise is to open up a file and count the number of lines of test it contains, and place that number in the variable int no_of_existing_devices, which is then used by the Device::Device() to create an object for each

class Device
{   
public:
    void view_attribute_list(); 
    void set_attribute();
    Device();
};

Device::Device()
{
    for (int count = 0; count < no_of_existing_devices; count ++)
    {
    // Create an object for each iteration, up to a maximum of no_of_existing_devices
    }
}

The class of which this variable is a member

class Initialise
{
public:
    int no_of_existing_devices;
    bool initialisation;
    string existing_device_list[100];

    void initialise_existing_devices();
    Initialise();
};

Initialise::Initialise()
{
    no_of_existing_devices = 0;
}

void Initialise::initialise_existing_devices()
{
    string line;
    ifstream DeviceList;
    DeviceList.open("devices/device_list");
    while (true)
    {
        getline(DeviceList, line, '\n');
        if (DeviceList.eof())
        {
            break;
        }
        ++ no_of_existing_devices;
    }
    DeviceList.close();

    DeviceList.open("devices/device_list");
    for (int i = 0; i < no_of_existing_devices; i ++)
    {
        getline(DeviceList, line, '\n');
        existing_device_list[i] = line;
    }

    Device existing_devices[no_of_existing_devices];
    !initialisation; // Existing devices are now initialised
}
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1  
Is this variable meant to be a member field of which ever class contains it? Does it depend on the existence of an instance, or can it exist alone? –  birryree Nov 23 '10 at 17:23
    
can you post your code so that we can get more understanding of what you are trying to achieve? –  pankajt Nov 23 '10 at 17:25
    
You will have to post more code so that we can understand what you wish to achieve. –  Puppy Nov 23 '10 at 17:36
    
The question has been updated with the code for the two classes in question. –  Chris Wilson Nov 23 '10 at 17:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Okay, from what I understand:

  1. You don't want to have a global
  2. You don't want to have a static
  3. You don't want to introduce a dependency between Device and Initialise

There is one other option, assuming something owns Device and Initialise, move the no_of_existing_devices up to there, then construct both Device and Initialise with a reference to this variable...

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In a similar circumstance I was just passing the pointer to the member --- I had to invoke a member function then, so it was a pointer to the member function, http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/pointers-to-members.html It's a bit messy, but it works :-).

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If the variable in the originating class can hold a value without an instance of the class I would assume that the variable is static. If not create a public static member of the class. And use it in the target class. Something like:

// .h file

class A 
{
   public:
       static int a;
}

// .cpp file

int A::a = 123;

// .cpp file of class B

void B::foo()
{
  cout << A::a;
}
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If it is a class attribute (internal variable), then you can obtain a reference through a get method. Otherwise, you can use the friend keyword on the class you want to access the attribtue from the other For example, if you declare friend class B; on class A, the attributes of the class B will be accessible on the class A.

I suggest you use the first method in order to maintain your code OO pure ;)

Edit: of course, if you access through a reference there are no resources wasted :)

Edit 2: use a static method on Initialise class that returns the no_of_existing_devices and call Initialise::NoOfExistingDevices() on the Device class. If you want to resources use a pointer like this:

public static int* Initialise::NoOfExistingDevices() {
    return &no_of_existing_devices;
}

By the way, I advise you to turn the variable private.

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