Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Would you write the following simple container any other way or it's totally sensible as it is:

template <typename T, bool small_>
struct TransType
{
   typedef const T& param_type;
};

template <typename T>
struct TransType<T, true>
{
   typedef const T param_type;
};

template <class T>
class Container:public TransType<T,sizeof(T)<=sizeof(void*)> {
 public:
  param_type getVal(){
   return obj;
  }
  void setVal(param_type input){
   containment=input;
  }
 private:
  T containment;
};
share|improve this question
1  
template <typename T> void UB() { TransType<T, sizeof(T)<=sizeof(void*)>* x = new Container<T>; delete x; // undefined behavior } :P (Base classes either need public virtual destructors or protected non-virtual destructors.) –  GManNickG Nov 23 '10 at 17:56
    
One drawback is that is doesn't compile ;) –  sth Nov 23 '10 at 18:02
    
@GMan: or make the inheritance private. Public base classes either need public virtual destructors or protected non-virtual destructors. Or a documented ban on using the base class for polymorphic delete, which is what the standard libraries go with, and which is more or less awkward depending what the base class is for. I don't think many programs have ever failed due to someone casting something to std::iterator to delete it. –  Steve Jessop Nov 23 '10 at 18:16
    
What is the purpose of this container? –  John Dibling Nov 23 '10 at 18:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Look into Boost.CallTraits. Namely, boost::call_traits<T>::param_type.

You shouldn't need the client to specify whether the type is small or not, that's the metafunction's job. Nor is there really a need to inherit from anything.

In fact your code right now is ill-formed. Because param_type isn't a dependent type, the lookup is done without taking into consideration the base class; and will not be found. You'd need to either explicitly qualify it with the base class, add a using-directive, or re-typedef it.

You just want to end up with:

template <typename T>
struct Container
{
    //typedef typename boost::call_traits<T>::param_type param_type;
    typedef typename TransType<T>::param_type param_type;

    // ...
};

By:

namespace detail
{
    template <typename T, bool small_>
    struct TransType
    {
       typedef const T& param_type;
    };

    template <typename T>
    struct TransType<T, true>
    {
       typedef const T param_type;
    };
}

template <typename T>
struct TransType<T>
{
   typedef detail::TransType<T, sizeof(T)<=sizeof(void*)> param_type;
};

Now the condition is automatic, and there's no base class hassle.

share|improve this answer

I wouldn't inherit from the metafunction.

share|improve this answer

Aside from GMan's comment about needing an explicit destructor in one form or another, does the added complexity gain you significant performance? The standard library seemed to think that it was up to the user to store an appropriate type in the container such that copying in some cases wasn't a bottleneck.

share|improve this answer
    
Since a copy is going to take place, I think this pre-optimization is actually very probably pointless. The question that I have is, is it harmful? –  Crazy Eddie Nov 23 '10 at 18:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.