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The benefits of embedding flash with JS to my knowledge:

  • ability to query navigator object and see what flash versions are installed, possibly branch out on that and feed different content based on this
  • consistent method of attaching flash, as the script keeps the markup and usually you just need to specify the src, flashvars, dimensions
  • save time by relying on helper utilities to embed the swf and not worry about intricate details
  • ability to provide consistent fallback if embedding multiple objects per site.

The disadvantages:

  • devices with no flash but JS enabled will completely fail
  • people get lazy and don't provide fallback content
  • code is a mess if it needs to be cross-browser compatible. there are various bugs with common embed ( even youtube's ) and the "best" cross-browser seems to be nesting an object in an object per this. I realize though, I can use a server-side method and define the embedding code once and change it in one area, but this makes it not embeddable/usable in CMS textareas.

The pros seem to outweigh the cons. I haven't really worked enough with mobile content to get an accurate opinion. Can anyone think of reasons why/why not?

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It would be nice if along with <video> and <audio> there was going to be <ria> or something to that effect. I think a better question might be: Any reason to ditch Flash in 2011. –  JD Isaacks Nov 23 '10 at 19:21
    
Good question, and one to which I'd like an answer from someone who's an expert in this area. Flash embedding seems a dark art. –  Tim Down Nov 23 '10 at 22:43
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I don't understand what you mean by "devices with no flash but JS enabled will completely fail". Isn't that one of the scenarios that embeding via JS is for? The JS detect if Flash is available, and only displays the Flash element if that is the case? –  Lars Blåsjö Nov 24 '10 at 21:55
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3 Answers

The disadvantages:

  1. devices with no flash but JS enabled will completely fail

    As @Lars pointed out in his comment, I think detecting Flash via JS is a failsafe way to inject different content(swf) for different platforms(OS, Browser, Flash Player version). The devices which have both Flash and JS disabled are the devices where all hell might break loose but that would be a very small percentage. I can't think of an easy way to circumvent that.

  2. people get lazy and don't provide fallback content.

    This obviously is very subjective. I have had very little experience using SwfObject but in my case, we were falling back to a pure HTML DOM based solution using lots of JS to simulate the module when we detected a NO FLASH situation. My point is that with SwfObject, providing alternative content is very easy and I dont see why any good developer wont do that.

  3. code is a mess if it needs to be cross-browser compatible. there are various bugs with common embed ( even youtube's ) and the "best" cross-browser seems to be nesting an object in an object per this. I realize though, I can use a server-side method and define the embedding code once and change it in one area, but this makes it not embeddable/usable in CMS textareas.

    I think i would agree on this one to an extent. Different embedding methods are a mess. There is this thread on StackOverflow discussing this issue: Best way to embed flash in html

There are situations where there is no alternative but to use Flash, for instance: a File Uploader with upload percentage feedback (as the regular INPUT tag Type FILE is just too archaic). Granted there is the new way to do upload progress bar using just javascript but it wont work in you know IE :)

In such situations, there is no way to get rid of Flash IMHO.

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I don't see a good reason to ditch JS flash embedding. SWFObject is pretty ubiquitous these days (pseudo-standard even!), and even Adobe recommends using it.

It makes sticky things like handling player version requirements and allowing the user to update their Flash plugin easy and straight forward.

SWFObject aside, it's my opinion that being able to use client side logic to embed content for any plugin will always be the way to go; it affords more opportunity to read into your user's environment, and deliver the appropriate content.

I suppose an argument can be made that it adds yet another requirement on the client side to deliver your content, but I think the vast majority of user's will have JS enabled... especially the users who are willing to consume Flash media.

Hope that helps :)

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As a counter question: Is there any reason to use javascript embedding methods in 2011?

I find that the flash satay method works best cross-browser, and follows a mostly DRY policy.

The markup is as follows:

<object id="something" name="something" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" data="path/to/file.swf">
  <param name="movie" value="path/to/file.swf" />
  <param name="flashvars" value="query=string" />
  <!-- Backup content here -->
</object>

This works great so long as you don't care about checking the user's flash version (a work-around is provided in the article).

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@zzzzBov: Be warned that the code you have provided doesn't work in IE9 RC. –  user645264 Mar 4 '11 at 18:44
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