Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sorry for a lot of code to read. It's the simplest way to show the problem.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace P1
{
    class A
    {
        static Dictionary<int, A> a = new Dictionary<int, A>();
        static int i = 0;

        int id;
        public A()
        {
            id = ++i;
            a[id] = this;
        }

        public static int Count() { return a.Count; }
    }

    class B : A
    {
        public B()
        {
            throw new Exception();
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            try
            {
                var b = new B();
            }
            catch
            {
               // What should be here ????
            }

            Console.WriteLine(A.Count()); //prints 1 - not good
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

Can anyone suggest cleanup logic for case when subclass constructor fails?

share|improve this question
    
That depends. Can your program recover somehow if B's constructor fails? Why is 1 "not good"? –  Frédéric Hamidi Nov 23 '10 at 19:58
    
Even if b fails, instance of a remains, and I don't know how to remove it. –  Marko Nov 23 '10 at 20:01
    
@Marko: if you would separate the concern of object creation from the concern of object insertion into the dictionary, then this question would not arise. –  John Saunders Nov 23 '10 at 20:06
    
Having a constructor that has side effects like this is often not a good design, but you might have reasons to do this. Also remember that the approach you have outlined is in no way thread-safe. –  driis Nov 23 '10 at 20:08
    
This is something already in use and I would like to change it as little as possible. –  Marko Nov 23 '10 at 20:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You will need to put the cleanup logic in the constructor of B, since you cannot have access to the instance reference after the constructor fails.

Here is an example on how you could do this:

class A
{
    static Dictionary<int, A> a = new Dictionary<int, A>();
    static int i = 0;

    int id;
    public A()
    {
        id = ++i;
        a[id] = this;
    }

    protected void Destroy()
    {
        a.Remove(id);
        i--;
    }

    public static int Count() { return a.Count; }
}

class B : A
{
    public B() 
    {
        try
        {
            throw new Exception();
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            Destroy();
            throw;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
How to do that? –  Marko Nov 23 '10 at 20:04
    
Note that this won't work if you say x=new B(); y=new B(); x=null; GC.Collect(); x=new B(); If you do this, you'll have 2 A's with ID 2, and only 1 of them will be in the dictionary. This is assuming the creation of the subclass object is ever successful. –  Kendrick Nov 23 '10 at 20:12
    
Interesting...but not good enough for me as I have a lot of subclass types :( –  Marko Nov 23 '10 at 20:13
    
Well, in that case you could make a static DestroyLastAllocation on A. But I would urge you strongly urge you to reconsider the design; especially if there are any possibility of multiple threads accessing these resources. –  driis Nov 23 '10 at 20:18
    
Maybe to remember last instance in static variable with ThreadStatic attribute? –  Marko Nov 23 '10 at 20:34

Your base class constructor is being called before the exception is thrown, so the object has already been created and assigned to it's spot in a. If you want the object to not be created by the constructor, then you might want to consider a static method to instantiate a new A instead of using the default constructor. Then, when the instantiation of the object fails (in B) you'll throw the exception before the object is added to the dictionary.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.