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Simplified: Because the way the problem was presented before was misleading. My mistake. Also not to make peoples' time a complete waste :) :::

Y.h

#ifndef Y_H
#define Y_H

#include <iostream>

class X;
class Y
{
    private:
        friend class X;
        void Print()
        {
            std::cout << "Y::Print" << std::endl;
        }
};

#endif

X.h

#ifndef X_H
#define X_H

#include "Y.h"

class X
{
    public:
        void Something(Y* pY)
        {
            pY->Print();
        }
};          

#endif

This is somewhat different from my original problem. I apologize for all the trouble :). I assure you, this IS possible.

Rules: Don't change Y.h or X.h. Get X::Something to do something other than what it is doing now.

This came to me when I was thinking about this.

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3  
Problem: Homework is due in 30 minutes, go! –  Woot4Moo Nov 23 '10 at 20:31
2  
@Woot4Moo: I never had homework like this. I wish I did. :) –  nakiya Nov 23 '10 at 20:32
2  
You keep dismissing answers based on what "you can't" do in this puzzle. But the posted question doesn't explain any such restrictions. –  aschepler Nov 23 '10 at 20:52
1  
What constitutes "the existing source code for these classes"? Node.cpp? Parser.cpp? Any other files which include Parser.h? If we can't write anything, we can't change the program's behavior. –  aschepler Nov 23 '10 at 21:12
1  
I am pretty sure you have excluded all possible approaches to this problem. Either I modify Node, or I modify Parser, or I use some sort of linker or loader trick to intercept the call to _ZN4Node8EvaluateEv, and you say I can't do any of those things. –  Zack Nov 23 '10 at 21:15

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's impossible.

At this point:

pRoot->Evaluate();

The compiler already knows it'll be calling Node::Evaluate, because it's non-virtual. You've said you cannot edit this implementation, so now you know the only path to take is to modify the implementation of Node::Evaluate.

Which you said you also cannot do. So that's it, you can't.


I'd recommend you stop beating around the bush and ask a real question. Say "this is the library I'm using, this is how I'm using it, here's what's happening, but here's what I want to happen. How?" Or even expand the scope to "Here's the problem I'm solving, and to solve it..." to allow completely different approaches.

But asking these "puzzle" questions with ill-defined parameters and goals is silly. So don't.

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Here is that question : stackoverflow.com/questions/4256803/… –  nakiya Nov 23 '10 at 21:12
    
@nakiya: That question is still lacking. Under what circumstances is that function being called? Why do you need to use that library? Why can't you move the check somewhere else and use that? –  GManNickG Nov 23 '10 at 21:14
    
Because checking if the divisor is zero then has to be done in the scripts. The scripts are written by a third party and it is advised not to restrict them. –  nakiya Nov 23 '10 at 21:18

If possible and not a huge pain, I would prefer to get and edit the source which defines class Node, make Evaluate virtual, and then recompile everything needed. Of course, this is not a hack at all.

If the source code is not available or building its library would be a huge pain, I might (on Linux) attempt using an LD_PRELOAD shared object containing only the (mangled) symbol Node::Evaluate().

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First method = impossible because source is a static lib you can't change. –  nakiya Nov 23 '10 at 20:38
    
Second method is painful :). Something more wicked please. –  nakiya Nov 23 '10 at 20:38
    
Second method also is tricky, since a function is not the same as a member function. On the other hand, it's the most promising approach I've seen. –  David Thornley Nov 23 '10 at 21:28
    
@David_Thornley: Well, I would create this shared object using the appropriate C++ compiler from a source file containing a definition of Node::Evaluate(). –  aschepler Nov 23 '10 at 23:20

There's no generalizable solution, because Evaluate may well have been inlined into Execute.

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Of course, my method is non-standard. –  nakiya Nov 23 '10 at 20:41

Find the address of the evaluate function and rewrite the first instruction in it with a JMP to your own, which evaluates the implementation defined representation of Node.

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Easy. Never include X.h (your problem never specifies that it should be included in any translation units) and redefine class X inside another header. Problemo solvo.

Edit: You could also do something REALLY evil like

#define void virtual void
#include "X.h"

and then inherit, or

#define X X_impl

and write your own new X class.

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:). Nice answer. –  nakiya Nov 23 '10 at 22:26
    
@nakiya: Check my edits too. Preprocessor abuse for the loss. –  Puppy Nov 23 '10 at 22:27
    
I did not think about 2nd method. Perhaps it's the bigger thief? Anyways, your first answer is incomplete. :) –  nakiya Nov 23 '10 at 22:29

Rules: Don't change Y.h or X.h. Get X::Something to do something other than what it is doing now.

Okay.

#include "Y.h"
class Hack {
public:
  static void Print();
};

#define Y Hack
#include "X.h"
#undef Y

void Hack::Print() {
  std::cout << "Something else" << std::endl;
}

int main() {
  Hack y;
  X().Something(&y);
  return 0;
}

Of course, this won't change the behavior of any existing translation units which already use Something, because you can't.

Also, if you try the same thing without the static keyword, make sure classes Hack and Y are layout-compatible.

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Have a class say MyNode derive from Node class. Provide a private virtual method say EvaluateImpl() to Node and to the new MyNode classes. Modify the Node::Evaluate() method to call the new private virtual method EvaluateImpl(). Move the existing functionality of Node::Evaluate() to the new Node::EvaluateImpl() method. Put your new functionality to MyNode::EvaluateImpl()
Then pass the derived class object to Parser::Execute() method.

class Node
{
     private:
         friend class Parser;
         void Evaluate() { EvaluateImpl(); }
         virtual void EvaluateImpl(); //Move functionality  from Evaluate() to here
};

class MyNode
{
     private:
         virtual void EvaluateImpl(); //Implement your new functionality.
};
share|improve this answer
    
:(. Read other posts and comments please. You can't change the source of Node or Parser –  nakiya Nov 23 '10 at 20:42
    
@Nokiya: Sorry, I supposed that you can modify the Node class, but you want an implementation you need keeping the other implementation. :( –  riderchap Nov 23 '10 at 20:46

If you can modify the parser make a new function EvaluateNode and put your new method in there.

You will have to replace all calls to Evaluate with EvaluateNode. This wouldn't work if you are relying on calls to Evaluate in code you can't modify.

Another way is to create another node class, say ModifiableNode which has a private node and implements all of it's functionality by calling Node methods, except for the Evaluate method. Then replace Node with ModifiableNode in Parser.

If you can't modify Parser, then you'll have to do something like aschepler suggested and create a new function and then somehow trick the linker into supplying your function instead of the library's. I have no idea how to do this, and sounds like a really bad idea to me.

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