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I'm trying to set up a querying interface where a user can select an arbitrary set of filters to ultimately fetch data from the database. The problem I'm running into is that LINQ-to-SQL is either not behaving as I was was expecting, or I'm doing something wrong, because only the first of my limiting WHERE conditions is being passed via SQL. The other filtering stuff seems to occur correctly, but, from what I can tell, it happens once the data has already been fetched.

Here's what I'm trying to do.

I have a database set up with a Sessions table. I've set up my LINQ-to-SQL mapping stuff, and I'm fetching the "active" sessions by filtering out null logout times, as well as any additional filters the user may specify:

public static IEnumerable<Session> GetSessions(params Func<Session, bool>[] filters)
{
    // I've created an auto-generate Linq-to-SQL context object with a Sessions table.
    using (DataSourceDataContext ctx = new DataSourceDataContext())
    {
        // Begin with all "active" sessions
        IEnumerable<Session> sessions = ctx.Sessions.Where(x => x.LogoutTime == null);
        foreach (var filter in filters)
            sessions = sessions.Where(filter);
        return sessions.ToArray();
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Func<Session, bool> mySessions = (x => x.UserName == "steven");
    IEnumerable<Session> sessions = GetSessions(mySessions);
}

When I run this, my resultant set is what I expect (i.e. Active sessions with username = "steven"), but a full list of active sessions was requested from SQL (via Profiler):

SELECT [t0].[ID], [t0].[UserName], [t0].[LoginTime], [t0].[LogoutTime], [t0].[Location]
FROM [dbo].[Sessions] AS [t0]
WHERE [t0].[LogoutTime] IS NULL

I was under the impression LINQ would continue to build the query behind the scenes until I iterated through my collection, but I can't figure out why it's not doing that for the SQL portion. Am I missing something, or am I just trying to make LINQ-to-SQL do something it's not intended to do?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are using IEnumerable<T> - this is pretty-much limited to processing the data locally, once materialized by your single .Where(...) on the LogoutTime; query composition demands IQueryable<T>. Which in turn will demand Expression<Func<Session, bool>> for each predicate.

Try:

public static Session[] GetSessions(
    params Expression<Func<Session, bool>>[] filters)
{
    // I've created an auto-generate Linq-to-SQL context object with
    // a Sessions table.
    using (var ctx = new DataSourceDataContext())
    {
        // Begin with all "active" sessions
        IQueryable<Session> sessions = ctx.Sessions
             .Where(x => x.LogoutTime == null);
        foreach (var filter in filters)
            sessions = sessions.Where(filter);
        return sessions.ToArray();
    }
}

You should still be able to call this with lambdas, but if you are explicitly handling Func<Session, bool> delegates those will need to be updated to expression-trees, via Expression<Func<Session, bool>>.

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That worked. Thank you very much! Your explanation helps as well, because I had after wondered about the difference between IQueryable and IEnumerable (and I had just discovered Expressions). –  Steven Nov 23 '10 at 22:17

You are assigning the result of the first ctx.Sessions.Where() statement to a variable of IEnumerable<Session>. This causes the subsequent filtering operations to use the Where extension method on IEnumerable, not IQueryable. The Queryable.Where method is the one for which the Linq2SQL linq provider can translate filter predicates (of type Expression> to actual SQL. Enumerable.Where accepts a Func delegate, and will do the filtering in memory

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use IQueryable instead of IEnumerable

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