Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why does self-invocation function inside a function don't get the scope of the outer function in JavaScript?

var prop = "global";

var hash = {
    prop: "hash prop",
    foo: function(){
        console.log(this.prop);
        (function bar(){
            console.log(this.prop);
        })();
    }
};

var literal = {
    prop: "object"
};

hash.foo();
// hash prop
// global

hash.foo.call(literal);
// object
// global

Looks like altering the scope of the outer function has no effect on the scope of the inner self-invocation function.

PS: The question is not about how to alter the scope of the inner function. But what is the proper explanation in the "Javascript language" perspective? Does all self executing functions have 'global' scope by default? If so, why?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Your problem is the this and what it references:

foo: function(){
    console.log(this.prop);
    (function bar(){
        console.log(this.prop);  <--- this does not reference to foo here, but instead it refers to the window object
    })();
}

You need to keep a reference to the outer this:

foo: function(){
    console.log(this.prop);

    var that = this;
    (function bar(){
        console.log(that.prop);  <--- tada!
    })();
}

Update
Some explanation. It's all about how JavaScript determines the context when invoking a function.

function Test() {
    this.name = "Test";
    this.bar = function() { console.log("My name is: "+ this.name);}
}

function Blub() {
    this.name = "Blub";
    this.foo = function() { console.log("My name is: " + this.name);}
} 

var a = new Test();
var b = new Blub();

// this works as expected
a.bar(); // My name is: Test
b.foo(); // My name is: Blub

// let's do something fun
a.foo = b.foo; // make an educated guess what that does...

a.foo() // My name is: Test

Huh? Aren't we referencing the method of Blub? No we're not. We are referencing the unbound function of Blub.

JavaScript binds on . (dots) and based on that it decides waht the value of this should be.

Since you're not calling your anonymous function on an object (therefore no .) it will make this reference to the global object, which is - in case of the browser - the window object.

Another example (one might think this would work):

var str = "Hello World";
var ord = str.charCodeAt; // let's make a little shortcut here.... bad idea

ord(0) // no dot... 

Instead of the char codes that are in str we get the ones that are in the global object, of course that's not a string so charCodeAt calls toString on which results in "[object DOMWindow]"

share|improve this answer
1  
this will refer to the global object, not to bar. More info. –  CMS Nov 23 '10 at 22:15
    
@CMS Yeah small black out here, it's quite late, fixed it. –  Ivo Wetzel Nov 23 '10 at 22:16
    
In your first example this do not references "bar". It references your root object (the window object if you are inside a web browser) –  Leo Lobeto Nov 23 '10 at 22:18

You are not applying any object as the this context when you call the inner function, so it gets this set to window by default. If you wanted to call the closure with the same this as the outer function, you would have to do:

(function bar(){
    console.log(this.prop);
}).call(this);

Or:

var that = this;
(function bar(){
    console.log(that.prop);
})();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the first solution! –  Box9 Nov 23 '10 at 22:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.