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what happens after the eof is reached with <> operator in perl?

I'm reading INP1 line by line with

while(<INP1>) {
}

but I need to do this reading multiple times and I need to start from the beginning of the file each time. How can I do that? Is there something like refreshing the stream in perl?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If INP1 is connected to a regular filehandle (not a socket handle or pipe handle), you can also seek back to the beginning of the file.

while(<INP1>) {
   ...
}
seek INP1, 0, 0;

# do it again
while (<INP1>) {
   ...
}

Another option is to load the entire file into an array one time, and then loop through that array as often as you wish. This is a good idea if the whole file fits comfortably in memory and if the contents of the file won't change between traversals.

open INP1, '<', $the_file;
@INP1 = <INP1>;
close INP1;

foreach (@INP1) {
   ...
}

# do it again
foreach (@INP1) {
   ...
}
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3  
use autodie; –  tchrist Nov 24 '10 at 1:38
2  
use lexically scoped filehandles –  planetp Nov 24 '10 at 20:41

In addition to using seek to go back to the start of the file, you could use Tie::File to treat the file as an array of lines. Depending on your access pattern, this might be more efficient than re-reading the file from the start each and every time.

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You can seek back to the beginning:

use Fcntl;
open INP1, ...
while (<INP1>) {
}
seek INP1, 0, SEEK_SET;
while (<INP1>) {
}

This will only work properly if INP1 is a real file (not a pipe or socket).

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5  
I sure hope this program start with use strict, use warnings qw<FATAL all>, use autodie, one or another flavor of use open qw< :std IO :utf8 >, END{close STDOUT}, and an explicit close INP1. Like, you know? :( –  tchrist Nov 23 '10 at 23:22
    
@tchrist: Good suggestions, but they don't address the question the OP asked so I consider them off-topic and won't include them in my answer. –  Adrian Pronk Nov 23 '10 at 23:36
1  
@Adrian: Making syscalls without checking their success is acceptable under what circumstances? –  tchrist Nov 24 '10 at 0:40
1  
@tchrist => I think part of the problem might be that most of the perldocs never explicitly check for errors, which probably keeps that from sticking as well as it could. I just spent a minute googling the docs, and the only example of seek with an error check that I saw was in one of your tutorials :) –  Eric Strom Nov 24 '10 at 1:26
    
@Eric: Agreed, but I'm not convinced that's a bad thing. Examples are provided to illustrate a point; error checking creates a distraction. If an example is about using a filehandle any appearance of open is secondary; error checking is tertiary noise. Additionally, the appropriate error response is application-dependent, so cargo-culting error checking isn't right, either (though it could lead to better code on average). Finally, "best practice" changes. e.g. even if the docs had open or die some would want it changed to use autodie. –  Michael Carman Nov 24 '10 at 15:08

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