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So I have only ever programmed in c++, but I have to do a small homework that requires the use of c. The problem I encountered is where I need a loop to read in numbers separated by spaces from the user (like: 1 5 6 7 3 42 5) and then take those numbers and fill an array.

the code I wrote is this:

int i, input, array[10];

for(i = 0; i < 10; i++){
scanf("%d", &input);
array[i] = input;
}

EDIT: added array definition. any suggestions or hints would be very highly appreciated.

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2  
So what goes wrong when you run this? –  Steve Townsend Nov 23 '10 at 23:46
1  
Where's your array definition? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 23 '10 at 23:46
    
Please show us the declaration for array. –  Jason Nov 23 '10 at 23:46
1  
What's the problem with your code? It appears to work here with a few modifications ... mostly #include and proper main –  pmg Nov 23 '10 at 23:46
2  
So let's see that code too. –  Steve Townsend Nov 24 '10 at 0:00
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4 Answers

Irrespective of whatever is wrong here, you should quickly learn to NEVER write code that does not check the return value from any API call that you make. scanf returns a value, and you have to be interested in what it says. If the call fails, your logic is different, yes?

Perhaps in this case it would tell you what's going wrong. The docs are here.

Returns the number of fields successfully converted and assigned; the return value does not include fields that were read but not assigned. A return value of 0 indicates that no fields were assigned.

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This code working good.

If your numbers is less than 10, then you must know how many numbers is before you start reading this numbers, or last number must be something like 0 to terminate output then you can do while(true) loop, but for dynamically solution you must read all line into string and then using sscanf to reading numbers from this string.

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it doesn't.. if you hit enter after fewer than 10 integers, the program will still wait for you to type more... –  sdadffdfd Nov 23 '10 at 23:52
    
scanf() will skip white pages preceeding integer values, so the returns you press are jsut skipped. The loop as coded will attempt to fetch 10 integers, regardless of how many returns you press. –  Peter G. McDonald Nov 23 '10 at 23:53
    
scanf() is an unsafe routine to use a lot of the time, far preferred for you to investigate fgets() and sscanf(). –  Peter G. McDonald Nov 23 '10 at 23:54
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You need the right #include and a proper main. The following works for me

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void) {

    /* YOUR CODE begin */
    int i, input, array[10];
    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        scanf("%d", &input);
        array[i] = input;
    }
    /* end of YOUR CODE */

    return 0;
}
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i'm not a c programmer but i can suggest an algorithm which is to use scanf("%s",&str) to read all the input into a char[] array then loop over it and test using an if statment if the current char is a space, if it is then add the preceeding number to the array

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You then may also suggest him how to allocate a big enough buffer to hold the str. –  Ivo Wetzel Nov 23 '10 at 23:52
    
assuming it's only an educational program.. we may skip the warning... –  sdadffdfd Nov 23 '10 at 23:55
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