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I've written this beauty:

#include <iostream>

struct something {
    static const char ref[];
};

const char something::ref[] = "";

template<int N, const char(&t_ref)[N], typename to> struct to_literal {
private:
    static to hidden[N];
public:
    to_literal() 
    : ref(hidden) {
        for(int i = 0; i < N; i++)
            hidden[i] = t_ref[i];
    }
    const to(&ref)[N];
};

template<int N, const char(&ref)[N], typename to> const to* make_literal() {
    return to_literal<N, ref, to>().ref;
}

int main() {
    const wchar_t* lit = make_literal<sizeof(something::ref), something::ref, wchar_t>();
}

It somewhat cleanly converts between string literal types. But when I compile it, MSVC says that the make_literal function is an undefined external function- which is clearly untrue as it's defined right there.

Edit: I've managed to reduce the problem down without all of the template gunk.

struct some {
    friend int main();
private:
    static wchar_t hidden[40];
public:
    some() 
    {    
    }
};

int main() {
    std::cout << some::hidden;
    //const wchar_t* lit = make_literal<sizeof(something::ref), something::ref, wchar_t>();
}
main.obj : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "private: static wchar_t * some::hidden" (?hidden@some@@0PA_WA)

It's just a static array. Does life hate me?

share|improve this question
    
I'm still trying to figure out what const char(&ref)[N] means. This code is either brilliant or insane –  Michael Mrozek Nov 24 '10 at 1:05
    
It's a reference to a string literal. –  DeadMG Nov 24 '10 at 1:06
    
".. this beauty" - A perfect example of the adage "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder" :) –  OJ. Nov 24 '10 at 1:07
1  
Your reduced program is not a complete, compilable example. –  Alex Budovski Nov 24 '10 at 1:19
    
@Alex: Forgive me, I forgot to include iostream. –  DeadMG Nov 24 '10 at 1:21
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The issue is that is that to_literal::hidden is declared but never defined. Take another look:

struct something {
    static const char ref[];  // declaration of something::ref
};

const char something::ref[] = "";  // definition of something::ref

template<int N, const char(&t_ref)[N], typename to> struct to_literal {
private:
    static to hidden[N];  // declaration of to_literal::hidden (but there's no
                          // definition anywhere)
public:
    to_literal() 
    : ref(hidden) {
        for(int i = 0; i < N; i++)
            hidden[i] = t_ref[i];
    }
    const to(&ref)[N];
};

To fix this, add a proper definition of to_literal::hidden:

template<int N, const char(&t_ref)[N], typename to>
to to_literal<N, t_ref, to>::hidden[N];  // definition of to_literal::hidden
share|improve this answer
    
I don't believe that it's unsafe, as the shared member is only ever copied from the template argument. Even if you created multiple to_literal instances from different threads, they're just going to assign it the same value. It doesn't matter which thread goes first or what view of what memory which threads have- because the value is the same on all of them. Also, for some reason, MSVC10 rejects that definition, it says that the template arguments are out of order. –  DeadMG Nov 24 '10 at 1:33
    
@DeadMG: Oops, you're right about the multithreading part after thinking about it more. I was thinking about what would happen if you called make_literal from multiple threads with different arguments, but if they have different arguments, then they'll refer to different template instances, so all is good. If the arguments are the same, there's a race, but it doesn't matter who wins. No idea why MSVC10 rejects this; g++ doesn't give anything even with -Wall -Wextra -pedantic. –  Adam Rosenfield Nov 24 '10 at 1:39
    
I can't work out why MSVC10 rejects this either. I checked that specific error on MSDN and I most definitely did not make that mistake. –  DeadMG Nov 24 '10 at 1:41
    
Yes, it looks like a bug in VC. If you change the reference to a pointer, it will work. I.e. const char (*t_ref)[N], and other necessary adjustments. –  Alex Budovski Nov 24 '10 at 1:55
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When you define static members, a declaration does not suffice. You must provide a definition outside the class. I.e. add

wchar_t some::hidden[40];

outside the class, and it'll be defined.

Otherwise, if C++ allowed this, it'd cause the same problem as defining a global variable in a header -- every .cpp file that includes it will come with a duplicate definition, and at link time you'd get a multiply-defined symbol error.

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You're declaring but not defining the static member. Add something like...

template<int N, const char(&t_ref)[N], typename to>
to to_literal<N, t_ref, to>::hidden[N];

I tried to check in MSVC for you too, but with VS2005 I get another stupid error...

template<int N, const char(&t_ref)[N], typename to> 
to to_literal<N, t_ref, to>::hidden[N]; 

...compiler complains of...

error C3860: template argument list following class template name must list parameters in the order used in template parameter list

Looks like when they fix one bug, there's another one behind it ;-/.

share|improve this answer
    
I've just tried that. Apparently, the class template argument list is mis-formed (and I remembered to add the array specifier on). –  DeadMG Nov 24 '10 at 1:24
    
That can't work--you need to define the static member for the particular template instantiation you're talking about. Remember, a template doesn't actually create anything, it only defines a way for creating something. –  Drew Hall Nov 24 '10 at 1:34
    
@Drew Hall: I'm defining it for all instantiations that may care to exist, just as if I defined a member function within the class, I'd expect that it would be instantiated for all instantiations unless I specialized the template. –  DeadMG Nov 24 '10 at 1:37
    
@DeadMG: I've cut-and-pasted your code and added the code above (array dim added - thanks), changed your literal to something, and outputted the result - all works fine with GCC 3.4.6. @Drew: templates are instantiated when they're used. –  Tony D Nov 24 '10 at 1:43
    
Yeah, I know. I checked the MSDN page for this error and I definitely did not do that. –  DeadMG Nov 24 '10 at 1:45
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When I built this with VC 2008, that wasn't the error I got. The error was:

Error 1 error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "private: static wchar_t * to_literal<1,&public: static char const * const something::ref,wchar_t>::hidden" (?hidden@?$to_literal@$00$1?ref@something@@2QBDB_W@@0PA_WA) main.obj Enabler

Removing static from the to hidden[N]; member resolved the issue.

Are you sure you got the error message correct?

share|improve this answer
    
@OJ: I misphrased the error message. I can't accept removing the static qualifier. It's just a static array, I don't understand what the issue is. –  DeadMG Nov 24 '10 at 1:14
    
I guess I wasn't clear enough in what I said. Removing the static actually defines the instance of the hidden member (which really is what I should have said the problem was). Another option is to define it externally, which is what Adam recommended. –  OJ. Nov 24 '10 at 3:39
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