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Let's say I have $('mySelector:first'); and $('mySelector').first();. Which way is the most efficient? I looked in the source, but still couldn't figure it out.

It looks like in the first case jQuery goes through every item until gets the first one:

CHILD: function( elem, match ) {
        var type = match[1],
        node = elem;
        switch ( type ) {
            ...
         case "first":
          while ( (node = node.previousSibling) )  {
           if ( node.nodeType === 1 ) { 
            return false; 
           }
          }
          if ( type === "first" ) { 
           return true; 
          }
          node = elem;
                ...
        }
}

In second case jQuery slices the collection, but I am not sure how efficient it is:

function first() {
  return this.eq( 0 );
};

function eq( i ) {
  return i === -1 ?
    this.slice( i ) :
    this.slice( i, +i + 1 );
};
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1  
The difference in speed is so minimal that it won't matter in the slightest. –  Alex Nov 24 '10 at 2:18
    
@Phrogz that's really obsessive. –  Raynos Jan 29 '11 at 16:54
1  
@Raynos Thank you (?) :) –  Phrogz Jan 29 '11 at 16:58
1  
@Alex the difference in speed appears to be a factor of 4, so it can add up in bigger selections. –  Yahel Feb 3 '11 at 23:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The current accepted answer is not consistent with tests across many browsers comparing :first and :eq(0) to .first() and .eq(0).

For the current major desktop browsers:
$('foo').first() is almost four times faster than $('foo:first')

If you want to inspect the methodology, here are the tests and their current results.

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1  
Good point, I will give the answer to you, unless shamittomar can provide his tests. –  Maksim Vi. Feb 3 '11 at 20:15
1  
Yay for data-driven answers! +1. –  Yahel Feb 3 '11 at 23:13

In my tests, $('mySelector:first'); is faster than $('mySelector').first();

You may also be interested in this;

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2  
Very good link, thank you. Now I am going to optimize my selectors =) Do you mind sharing the tests? –  Maksim Vi. Nov 24 '10 at 5:50
1  
Did you test across different browsers, versions, and OS? Did you test across documents with single matched element versus 10s and 100s? –  Phrogz Jan 29 '11 at 16:48

Compare $('li:first') to $('li').first(), I bet the first one must be faster. Because for example, in a document containing 100 li, then the second query would simply build a list of 100 items and then, return the first one from it; on the other hand, the first query will stop right there after the first li is returned.

Even the query is handled natively by the browser, it still takes more memory than the first one.

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Plus, CSS selectors will eventually all be implemented by the browser, which will make it even faster. –  Box9 Nov 24 '10 at 4:05
2  
Your logic is hypothetically valid, but have you examined the Sizzle source to ensure that the :first pseudo-class is applied during finding, and not after finding the full set? –  Phrogz Jan 29 '11 at 16:52

The second would have to fetch ALL the items in the selector before getting the first. So the if the selector was 10,000 items it would fetch all 10,000 then the first from that group. I would hope the first would be better in this regard since it would filter as it searches (and stopping after the first was found). Probably trivial in most cases, though.

Of course if you are chaining functions then it may be unavoidable:

$('.someclass').addClass('otherClass').first().addClass('firstClass');
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