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$array = array(
    array('name' => 'civilian 1'), //Random
    array('name' => 'civilian 2'), //Random
    array('name' => 'civilian 3'), //Random
    array('name' => 'civilian 4'), //Random
    array('name' => 'civilian 5'), //Random
    array('name'=>'Rich', 'desc' => 'I am a Sponsor'), //Keep at the top
    array('name'=>'Rich 2', 'desc' => 'I am a Sponsor'), //Keep at the top
            );

if `desc has any string` will keep at the top   
else if `desc is null` will random after `desc has any string`'s array

Example 1 Output

name: Rich
name: Rich 2
name: civilian 3
name: civilian 2
name: civilian 5
name: civilian 4
name: civilian 1

Example 2 Output

name: Rich
name: Rich 2
name: civilian 4
name: civilian 5
name: civilian 2
name: civilian 1
name: civilian 3

Thanks a lot.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you don't mind modifying your original array, this will work.

(also, don't put a semicolon (;) after array members inside an array() construct).

$array = array(
    array('name' => 'civilian 1'),
    array('name' => 'civilian 2'),
    array('name' => 'civilian 3'),
    array('name' => 'civilian 4'),
    array('name' => 'civilian 5'),
    array('name'=>'Rich', 'desc' => 'I am a Sponsor'),
    array('name'=>'Rich 2', 'desc' => 'I am a Sponsor')
);

$newArray = array(); 
foreach($array as $index => $member) {
   if (isset($member['desc'])) {
       $newArray[] = $member;
       unset($array[$index]);
   }
}

shuffle($array);

$newArray = array_merge($newArray, $array);

Outputs...

array(7) {
  [0]=>
  array(2) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(4) "Rich"
    ["desc"]=>
    string(14) "I am a Sponsor"
  }
  [1]=>
  array(2) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(6) "Rich 2"
    ["desc"]=>
    string(14) "I am a Sponsor"
  }
  [2]=>
  array(1) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(10) "civilian 5"
  }
  [3]=>
  array(1) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(10) "civilian 1"
  }
  [4]=>
  array(1) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(10) "civilian 4"
  }
  [5]=>
  array(1) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(10) "civilian 3"
  }
  [6]=>
  array(1) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(10) "civilian 2"
  }
}

See it!

share|improve this answer
    
It's great idea. –  love Nov 24 '10 at 3:18
foreach ($array as $ppl) {
    if ($ppl['desc']) $withDesc[] = $ppl;
    else $without[] = $ppl;
}

shuffle($without);

$result = array_merge($withDesc, $without);
share|improve this answer
    
This is issuing notices on members where the desc key is not set. –  alex Nov 24 '10 at 3:00
    
Add an isset() check like in the other similar answer to this post. –  Macy Abbey Nov 24 '10 at 3:06
    
@alex and that's why we love php. Though to address unwanted notices change your if statement to if(isset(... –  Mikhail Nov 24 '10 at 3:06
    
It will make debugging a pain though if you set error_reporting(E_ALL) and then have to wade through the notices. –  alex Nov 24 '10 at 3:21

Create your own usort delegation function.

http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.usort.php

Return 1 when an element with a desc is being compared to an element without, and either 1, 0 or -1 when two elements with descs are being compared, based on the description text.

When two elements without descriptions are compared, return 1,0,-1 randomly, but make sure to store what random choice you made. It could be disastorous to return -1 when A and B are compared, but 1 next time they are compared. I'm not certain the usort algorithm employed in PHP would ever compare two elements twice, but it is definitely possible.

share|improve this answer
    
What sorting algorithm compares same pair twice other than bubble sort? –  Mikhail Nov 24 '10 at 2:51
1  
@Mikhail, any sorting algorithm where the dataset has duplicates –  tobyodavies Nov 24 '10 at 2:57
    
By the way, I would definitely use the approaches above for your specific problem if I were you. My way is more obscure and not as easy to understand. It does offer some advantages, but not in the situation you describe above in my opinion. Too bad for me I did not think a litle harder before replying. –  Macy Abbey Nov 24 '10 at 3:03
    
That wouldn't be the same pair.. same value, but not the same pair. Most common algorithms - Merge Sort and Quick Sort, don't compare same pair twice, even if the data set consists of identical values. –  Mikhail Nov 24 '10 at 3:13
    
I've modified my response to reflect the validity of your statements Mikhail. –  Macy Abbey Nov 24 '10 at 3:15

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