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I have a fixed content in my text view inside a scroll view. When the user scrolls to a certain position, I would like to start an activity or trigger a toast.

<ScrollView xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
 android:layout_width="fill_parent" android:layout_height="fill_parent"
 android:id="@+id/scroller">
 <LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
  android:orientation="vertical" android:layout_width="fill_parent"
  android:layout_height="fill_parent">
  <TextView android:layout_width="fill_parent" android:id="@+id/story"
   android:layout_height="wrap_content" android:text="@string/lorem"
   android:gravity="fill" />
 </LinearLayout>
</ScrollView>

My problem is in implementing the protected method onScrollChanged to find out the position of the scroll view.

I have found this answer, is there an easier solution to this rather than declaring an interface, over ride the scrollview etc as seen on the link I posted?

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1  

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No.

ScrollView doesn't provide a listener for scroll events or even a way to check how far down the user has scrolled, so you have to do what is suggested by the link.

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7  
There is a method onScrollChanged that can be overridden. Likelwise getScrollX, getScrollY can be used. –  Werner Van Belle Dec 10 '12 at 21:29

There is a much easier way than subclassing the ScrollView. The ViewTreeObserver object of the ScrollView can be used to listen for scrolls.

Since the ViewTreeObserver object might change during the lifetime of the ScrollView, we need to register an OnTouchListener on the ScrollView to get it's ViewTreeObserver at the time of scroll.

final ViewTreeObserver.OnScrollChangedListener onScrollChangedListener = new
                           ViewTreeObserver.OnScrollChangedListener() {

    @Override
    public void onScrollChanged() {
        //do stuff here 
    }
};

final ScrollView scrollView = (ScrollView) findViewById(R.id.scroller);
scrollView.setOnTouchListener(new View.OnTouchListener() {
    private ViewTreeObserver observer;

    @Override
    public boolean onTouch(View v, MotionEvent event) {
        if (observer == null) {
            observer = scrollView.getViewTreeObserver();
            observer.addOnScrollChangedListener(onScrollChangedListener);
        }
        else if (!observer.isAlive()) {
            observer.removeOnScrollChangedListener(onScrollChangedListener);
            observer = scrollView.getViewTreeObserver();
            observer.addOnScrollChangedListener(onScrollChangedListener);
        }

        return false;
    }
});
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1  
That's not necessarily easier than subclassing ScrollView. It's actually more code. If you subclass you can just override the onScrollChanged method. –  Christopher Perry Oct 2 '13 at 18:15
1  
I tried this and it seems to fire the event 20 times or more for the same scroll Y value. It doesn't seem ideal. –  RandomEngy Apr 1 '14 at 20:53
    
Well... there is a huge problem with this code! And this issue is resulting in errors like the one from @RandomEngy comment. Therefore I don't know why it got upvoted so high. It adds this listener ON EVERY TOUCH EVENT ON SCROLL. So basically if you click your scroll 20 times it will result in 20 calls to listener. The Listener should just be added once. For example like this: scrollView.getViewTreeObserver().addOnScrollChangedListener(new ViewTreeObserver.OnScrollChangedListener() { @Override public void onScrollChanged() { //do stuff }});. NOT INSIDE ON TOUCH METHOD –  blipinsk Jan 12 at 14:43
    
or even worse it will probably add AT LEAST 40 listeners (at least TOUCH_DOWN and TOUCH_UP for every click) in the example. –  blipinsk Jan 12 at 23:10
    
I had OnTouchListener because the documentation says "The returned ViewTreeObserver observer is not guaranteed to remain valid for the lifetime of this View". I've edited the answer so that if the ViewTreeObserver isn't alive anymore, the callback to it is removed and added to View's current ViewtreeObserver. –  Shubhadeep Chaudhuri Jan 13 at 8:43

Actually there is a way to know how far the user has scrolled. The method getScrollY() from ScrollView tells you that.

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Nope, according to this: stackoverflow.com/questions/2132370/… –  Timmmm Nov 9 '12 at 23:55
    
I used this solution in a project in my company. I test everything before i post something here. Maybe you should do the same? –  tulio84z Nov 11 '12 at 2:08
    
Sorry, misread the question. It works for a ScrollView but not a ListView or a GridView. –  Timmmm Nov 11 '12 at 14:51

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