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I have 2 tables
1) "products" with fields (productid PK, name, description, price)
2) "sales" with fields (salesid PK, salestime, productid, customername, customeremail, status)

I need to display data in table format as

SalesID      Product Name      Amount      Customer Name      Customer Address      Payment Status

For this, I am using following query

SELECT s.salesid, p.name, p.price, s.customername, s.customeremail, s.status 
FROM sales s 
LEFT JOIN products p ON s.productid = p.productid 
ORDER BY salestime DESC 
LIMIT 0, 15 

Is there any way I can still optimize this query to run faster?

share|improve this question
    
JOIN s and ORDER BY s are where you will see a slow down, but if you changed those, you wouldn't get back the data you want, in the order you want it. The query looks good to me, but an index on the salestime and product_id columns would probably help speed things up a bit. Also, can you store this query as a view or stored procedure? When a SQL is called, the server needs to compile the SQL code, then execute it. When it's called from a view or stored proc, it's precompiled by the server, which could save a few more milliseconds.. –  bakoyaro Nov 24 '10 at 5:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Do you have the appropriate indexes on the tables?

Have a look at CREATE INDEX Syntax and How MySQL Uses Indexes

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if tables are already filled with data, and I index them they won't make any difference? should I remove all data, then create index or is there any other way around? –  I-M-JM Nov 24 '10 at 4:59
    
NO no no no. Creating the index with data in the tables should be fine. –  Adriaan Stander Nov 24 '10 at 5:15
    
OK, thanks for the help, and providing answers –  I-M-JM Nov 24 '10 at 7:59

The query is as good as it can be. By their nature queries specify WHAT to do, not HOW to do it.

It's the RDMS below it that will effect your performance, and the main way to impact a query like this is to add indexes the columns on which you join (each table's oroductid)

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is it good to use equi-join or left-join is proper? –  I-M-JM Nov 24 '10 at 4:47
1  
depends on the result you want. if no match is made between the two tables for a certain row (of your 'left' table) do you want these fields to be displayed along with nulls from the counterpart in the other table (LEFT JOIN)? or do you just want it to not be listed (INNER JOIN, of which EQUI is a type)? –  jon_darkstar Nov 24 '10 at 4:53

The query is fine. Try indexing productid in both tables, as well as salestime.

share|improve this answer
    
if tables are already filled with data, and I index them they won't make any difference? should I remove all data, then create index or is there any other way around? –  I-M-JM Nov 24 '10 at 5:00
    
Just add the indexes and they'll index the existing data. –  RedFilter Nov 24 '10 at 17:35

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