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list<string> l;
string s;

getline(cin, s);
l.push_back(s);
getline(cin, s);
l.push_back(s);

Using input

123
test

Printing the list 'l' results:

123
test

Shouldn't this print:

test
test

I'm a little confused as to why the string is being passed by value.

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2  
Right. Why were you expecting otherwise? –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 24 '10 at 6:26
2  
I think Christopher is confusing Java List and C++ list –  Jason Rogers Nov 24 '10 at 6:29
1  
@user440336: amazing how someone can come to expect something so broken :-). C++'s behaviour is far more intuitive, the Java/C#/Ruby behaviour a way to try to make code written without any thought to ownership perform ok (as that's generally intangible), assuming people will learn to clone stuff when the results are wrong (as that's more likely to be noticed). But only for objects, right, as it'd be too obviously weird if strings and numbers behaved like that too 8->...! –  Tony D Nov 24 '10 at 6:49
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

push_back copies the string object s passed into it. So wahetever modification you do to s is not affecting the pushed back value.

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It shouldn't, because the string is copied when you add it to the list l. string argument is passed by reference to getline:

istream& getline ( istream& is, string& str );
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But according to cplusplus.com/reference/stl/list/push_back (void push_back ( const T& x );) the argument appears to be passed by reference. –  Christopher Dorian Nov 24 '10 at 6:31
3  
@Christopher Dorian: The argument may be passed by reference, but that doesn't prevent the push_back from making a copy of the passed object and storing it in its internal datastrucures. –  Naveen Nov 24 '10 at 6:32
    
@Chris: That's not enough for you to deduce what it does with that reference. You need to read the docs more carefully. –  Yuki Izumi Nov 24 '10 at 6:38
    
@Christopher: In your link, it even says, under Parameters:, "x Value to be copied to the new element." –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 24 '10 at 6:39
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Your title is misleading; you don't have a loop anywhere in the code that you posted.

The string is being passed by value to push_back, which makes a copy in the list. The results you're getting are exactly what I would expect.

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Pseudocode:

void list::push_back(string& s)
{
   list_.add(new string(s));   // copy string
}

You see, the string is copied in push_back method. It is passed by reference just to avoid a redundant copying.

void list::push_back(string s) // copy string
{
   list_.add(new string(s));   // copy string
}
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Good points, but your pseudocode should accept s by const string reference. –  Tony D Nov 24 '10 at 6:48
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