Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been teaching myself C++ and started creating a list organizer to work on the concept of pointers.

I've defined a class called List which has three properties:

int itemTotal;
Item* firstItem;
Item* lastItem;

The constructor sets their values as:

itemTotal = 0;
firstItem = NULL;
lastItem = NULL;

I've built a function to return the value of itemTotal:

int List::getItemTotal()
{
    return itemTotal;
}

Immediately after building the object in my driver, itemTotal starts acting funny and returning really large numbers (-858993460 every time), even though no work has been done on the List and literally nothing has happened in the program. I added a cout to the constructor, just to see what was going on there, and it echos out the 0 value, but once that constructor is done the value immediately changes.

I've been trying to work it out with my books and play around with it, but I can't seem to resolve the issue, so I figured I'd turn to someone with more experience. Main is below:

int main()
{
    List grocery;
    cout << "itemTotal is now: " << grocery.getItemTotal() << endl; // Returns wrong value...


    system("Pause");
    return 0;
}

With output looking like:

grocery List is built!
itemTotal inside of the constructor is 0!
itemTotal is now: -858993460

Any ideas? =/

EDIT: Per request, the entire class (sorry formatting is ugly, I don't want to re-do it all):

class List
{
public:
// Constructor
// Purpose: Builds object.
// Returns: Nothing.
// Pre-Conditions: None.
// Post-Conditions: Initializes null.
List();

// push_back function
// Purpose: Adds Item to end of List.
// Returns: None.
// Pre-Conditions: Must pass a declared Item object.
// Post-Conditions: None.
void push_back(Node*);

// push_front function
// Purpose: Adds Item to beginning of List.
// Returns: None.
// Pre-Conditions: Must pass a declared Item object.
// Post-Conditions: None.
void push_front(Node*);

// pop_back function
// Purpose: Removes last Item from List. Item is NOT deleted.
// Returns: Pointer to removed Item.
// Pre-Conditions: None.
// Post-Conditions: None.
Node* pop_back();

// pop_front function
// Purpose: Removes first Item from List. Item is NOT deleted.
// Returns: Pointer to removed Item.
// Pre-Conditions: None.
// Post-Conditions: None.
Node* pop_front();

// getFirst function
// Purpose: Returns pointer to first Item in List.
// Returns: Pointer.
// Pre-Conditions: List must have a Item object.
// Post-Conditions: None.
Node* getFirst();

// getItemTotal function
// Purpose: Returns the itemTotal
// Returns: Int
// Pre-Conditions: None.
// Post-Conditions: None.
int getItemTotal();
private:
Item* firstitem;
Item* lastitem;
int itemTotal;

}

and the constructor:

List::List()
{
Item* firstNode = NULL;
Item* lastNode = NULL;
int itemTotal = 0;
cout << "item total should start at 0, it is " << nodeTotal << " inside of the constructor." << endl;
}
share|improve this question
2  
My first guess is undefined behavior somewhere. Can you post the code of your class ? –  ereOn Nov 24 '10 at 8:09
2  
Hmm... Obviously you are hiding something from us :) –  Armen Tsirunyan Nov 24 '10 at 8:09
2  
Can you post the full declaration and definition of List? Is it really just a simple constructor? –  EboMike Nov 24 '10 at 8:09
3  
I love people that describe the code rather than just posting the code as the description is just so much more accurate and easier to understand than the real code. Can posting a compilable piece of code that reproduces the problem be so hard! –  Loki Astari Nov 24 '10 at 8:14
2  
That obviously is NOT THE CODE. As this has syntax errors. There is no member variable called nodeTotal –  Loki Astari Nov 24 '10 at 8:19
show 1 more comment

4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Haaa! You are initializing a local variable in the constructor not the member!! Instead of int itemTotal = 0; write this->itemTotal = 0; or just itemTotal = 0 or even use constructor initialization list like this

List::list()
   :itemTotal(0),
    firstNode(NULL),
    lastNode(NULL)   
{
   cout << "List ctor Called"
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think C++ way to initiate the members is quite confusing at first. So the version which you do it inside the constructor is more preferable and more readable, unless you are inheriting the constructor. –  starcorn Nov 24 '10 at 8:24
    
Indeed, fixes it. Thanks for the catch. :) –  DivinusVox Nov 24 '10 at 8:25
2  
@starcom, @DivinusVox : Ctor lists are superior to initialization inside - for example had you done that in the first place, your error had no chance to take place... –  Armen Tsirunyan Nov 24 '10 at 8:26
    
Not sure what they are... Probably later on it the book. Deitel is doing a decent job thus far, but I'm taking it at the pace I'm given for now. –  DivinusVox Nov 24 '10 at 8:30
    
@Armen yes but I've never done that fault I always use this->variable_name ;) –  starcorn Nov 24 '10 at 8:32
show 2 more comments

You declared local values in your constructor with the same name as the members. They hide the value of the members, so when you set itemTotal = 0;, you are actually just setting the value of a local variable. Your constructor should just look like this:

List::List()
    :itemTotal(0), firstNode(NULL), lastNode(NULL)
{
    cout << "item total should start at 0, it is " << itemTotal << " inside of the constructor." << endl;

}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You are initializing local variables and not class members.

Replace:

List::List()
{
Item* firstNode = NULL;
Item* lastNode = NULL;
int itemTotal = 0;
cout << "item total should start at 0, it is " << nodeTotal << " inside of the constructor." << endl;
}

By:

List::List()
{
  firstNode = NULL;
  lastNode = NULL;
  itemTotal = 0;
  cout << "item total should start at 0, it is " << nodeTotal << " inside of the constructor." << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Remark that your compiler is probably generating warnings about this. –  Benoit Thiery Nov 24 '10 at 8:19
add comment

Your problem is that you are declaring local variables inside the constructor that hide the member variables:

List::List()
{
    Item* firstNode = NULL;  // declares a new variable.
    Item* lastNode = NULL;
    int itemTotal = 0;
    cout << "item total should start at 0, it is " << nodeTotal << " inside of the constructor." << endl;
}

Your code should look like this:

List::List()
{
    firstNode = NULL;
    lastNode = NULL;
    itemTotal = 0;

    // fix this line: cout << "item total should start at 0, it is " << nodeTotal << " inside of the constructor." << endl;
}

It would be even better if you used an initializaer list:

List::List()
    : firstNode(NULL)
    , lastNode(NULL)
    , itemTotal(0)
{
    // Fix this line cout << "item total should start at 0, it is " << nodeTotal << " inside of the constructor." << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.